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60 books of Colin Dexter

"Cunning...­Your imagination will be frenetically flapping its wings until the very last chapter.­"
THE WASHINGTON POST BOOK WORLD
Morse is enjoying a rare if unsatisfying holiday in Dorset when the first letter appears in THE TIMES. A year before, a stunning Swedish student disappeared from Oxfordshire, leaving behind a rucksack with her identification. As the lady was dishy, young, and traveling alone, the Thames Valley Police suspected foul play. But without a body, and with precious few clues, the investigation ground to a halt. Now it seems that someone who can hold back no longer is composing clue-­laden poetry that begins an enthusiastic correspondence among England's news-­reading public. Not one to be left behind, Morse writes a letter of his own--­and follows a twisting path through the Wytham Woods that leads to a most shocking murder.

From the Paperback edition.

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SUMMARY:
"[Morse is] the most prickly, conceited, and genuinely brilliant detective since Hercule Poirot.­"--­The New York Times Book ReviewNicholas Quinn is deaf, so he considers himself lucky to be appointed to the Foreign Examinations Board at Oxford, which designs tests for students of English around the world. But when someone slips cyanide into Nicholas's sherry, Inspector Morse has a multiple-­choice murder. Any one of a tight little group of academics could have killed Quinn. Before Morse is done, all their dirty little secrets will be exposed. And a murderer will be cramming for his finals. . . . "[Dexter] is a magician with character, story construction, and the English language. . . . Colin Dexter and Morse are treasures of the genre.­"--­Mystery News"It is a delight to watch this brilliant, quirky man [Morse] deduce.­"--­Minneapolis Star & Tribune

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Why would a sniper shoot suburban physiotherapist Rachel James as she sips her morning coffee? Inspector Morse's hunt for answers kicks off with a tabloid journalist, winds through the strip clubs of Soho, then returns to Oxford, where two senior dons and their wives battle for a plum promotion. Then, on the personal front, Inspector Morse receives intimations of his own mortality.­And while Morse muses on life, he reveals his first name at last. . . .­From the Paperback edition.

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The case seems so simple, Inspector Morse deemed it beneath his notice. A wealthy, elderly American tourist has a heart attack in her room at Oxford's luxurious Randolph Hotel. Missing from the scene is the lady's handbag, which contained the Wolvercote Tongue, a priceless jewel that her late husband had bequeathed to the Ashmolean Museum just across the street. Morse proceeds to spend a great deal of time thinking--­and drinking--­in the hotel's bar, certain the solution is close at hand--­until conflicting stories, suspicious doings, and a real murder convince him otherwise...

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'Do you think I'm wasting your time, Lewis?­' Lewis was nobody's fool and was a man of some honesty and integrity. 'Yes, sir.­' An engaging smile crept across Morse's mouth. He thought they could get on well together . . .­' The death of Sylvia Kaye figured dramatically in Thursday afternoon's edition of the Oxford Mail. By Friday evening Inspector Morse had informed the nation that the police were looking for a dangerous man -- facing charges of wilful murder, sexual assault and rape. But as the obvious leads fade into twilight and darkness, Morse becomes more and more convinced that passion holds the key . . .

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Books of Colin Dexter