Author rate:
Page 1 from 52

518 books of Edith Wharton

Having begun my book with the statement that Morocco still lacks a guide-­book, I should have wished to take a first step toward remedying that deficiency. But the conditions in which I travelled, though full of unexpected and picturesque opportunities, were not suited to leisurely study of the places visited. The time was limited by the approach of the rainy season, which puts an end to motoring over the treacherous trails of the Spanish zone. In 1918, owing to the watchfulness of German submarines in the Straits and along the northwest coast of Africa, the trip by sea from Marseilles to Casablanca, ordinarily so easy, was not to be made without much discomfort and loss of time. Once on board the steamer, passengers were often kept in port (without leave to land) for six or eight days; therefore for any one bound by a time-­limit, as most war-­workers were, it was necessary to travel across country, and to be back at Tangier before the November rains.

Book rate:
2095 downloads
  read online  

The Age of Innocence is an intimate portrayal of East Coast American society in the 19th century--­and the human lives that came into conflict with it. Newland Archer is heir to one of New York City's first families, and his bride-­to-­be is everything he ever hoped. Then his fiancee's older cousin leaves her European husband and appears in New York, where she refuses to conform to society and her family's wishes. Archer is at first angered and then intrigued by her. Their passionate relationship challenges everything he believes and ultimately suffers at the hands of society and family obligation. The novel won the Pulitzer Prize; Wharton was the first woman to win it.

Book rate:
1593 downloads
  read online  
Book rate:
693 downloads
  read online  

Nineteenth-­century New England villager Ethan Frome is tormented by his love for his ailing wife's cousin. Trapped, he may ultimately be destroyed by that which offers his greatest chance at happiness...

Book rate:
414 downloads
  read online  

Considered by some to be her finest work, Edith Wharton’s created a sensation when first published in 1917, as it was one of the first novels to deal honestly with a young woman’s sexual awakening. is the story of Charity Royall, a child of mountain moonshiners adopted by a family in a poor New England town, who has a passionate love affair with Lucius Harney, an educated man from the city. Wharton broke the conventions of women’s romantic fiction by making Charity a thoroughly independent modern woman—in touch with her emotions and sexuality, yet kept from love and the larger world she craves by the overwhelming pressures of heredity and society. Praised for its realism and honesty by such writers as Joseph Conrad and Henry James and compared to Flaubert’s remains as fresh and powerful a novel today as when it was first written.

Book rate:
155 downloads
  read online  

Edith Wharton’s lacerating satire on marriage and materialism in turn-­of-­the-­century New York features her most selfish, ruthless, and irresistibly outrageous female character.

Undine Spragg is an exquisitely beautiful but ferociously acquisitive young woman from the Midwest who comes to New York to seek her fortune. She achieves her social ambitions—but only at the highest cost to her family, her admirers, and her several husbands. Wharton lavished on Undine an imaginative energy that suggests she was as fascinated as she was appalled by the alluring monster she had created. It is the complexity of her attitude that makes The Custom of the Country—with its rich social and emotional detail and its headlong narrative power—one of the most fully realized and resonant of her works.­Review"Edith Wharton's finest achievement.­"
--­Elizabeth Hardwick About the AuthorEdith Wharton (1862-­1937) was born into high society in New York City. After divorcing her husband in 1913 she took up . . .

Book rate:
126 downloads
  read online  

The House of Mirth is the fourth novel by Edith Wharton. First published in 1905, the novel is Wharton's first important work of fiction. It sold 140,­000 copies between October and the end of December, adding to Wharton's existing fortune. The House of Mirth was written while Edith Wharton lived at The Mount, her home in Lenox, Massachusetts.­The House of Mirth tells the story of Lily Bart, a woman who is torn between her desire for luxurious living and a relationship based on mutual respect and love. She sabotages all her possible opportunities for a wealthy marriage, loses the esteem of her social circle, and dies young, poor, and alone. Lily is initially of good social standing and rejects several offers of advantageous marriage. The book begins with Lily's 'scandalous' visit at a single man's apartment (Lawrence Selden). They seem to have a feeling for each other, but, unfortunately, Lawrence is not in possession of a big fortune, which turns Lily rather towards Percy Gryce, a . . .

Book rate:
78 downloads
  read online  
Book rate:
95 downloads
  read online  
Book rate:
87 downloads
  read online  

A young lawyer sells a package of love letters written to him over the years by a distinquished novelist to raise money to pay for his wedding to another woman. His secret comes back to haunt him and, when he confesses to his wife, their marriage is reduced to resigned coexistence.

Book rate:
100 downloads
  read online  

Comments

No comments yet

Books of Edith Wharton