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206 books of Rabindranath Tagore

MOTHER, today there comes back to mind the vermilion mark1 at the parting of your hair, the sari2 which you used to wear, with its wide red border, and those wonderful eyes of yours, full of depth and peace. They came at the start of my life's journey, like the first streak of dawn, giving me golden provision to carry me on my way. The sky which gives light is blue, and my mother's face was dark, but she had the radiance of holiness, and her beauty would put to shame all the vanity of the beautiful. Everyone says that I resemble my mother. In my childhood I used to resent this. It made me angry with my mirror. I thought that it was God's unfairness which was wrapped round my limbs?­that my dark features were not my due, but had come to me by some misunderstanding. All that remained for me to ask of my God in reparation was, that I might grow up to be a model of what woman should be, as one reads it in some epic poem. When the proposal came for my marriage, an astrologer was sent, . . .

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Most of the lyrics of love and life, the translations of which
from Bengali are published in this book, were written much
earlier than the series of religious poems contained in the book
named Gitanjali. The translations are not always literal--
the originals being sometimes abridged and sometimes
paraphrased.

Rabindranath Tagore.

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Gitanjali (Bengali: and#2455;­and#2496;­and#2468;­and#2494;­and#2462;­and#2509;­and#2460;­and#2482;­and#2495;­) is a collection of poems by the Bengali poet Rabindranath Tagore. The original Bengali collection of 157 poems was published on August 14, 1910. The English Gitanjali or Song Offerings is a collection of 103 English poems of Tagore's own English translations of his Bengali poems first published in November 1912 by the India Society of London.

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Perhaps it is well for me to explain that the subject-­matter of the papers published in this book has not been philosophically treated, nor has it been approached from the scholar's point of view. The writer has been brought up in a family where texts of the Upanishads are used in daily worship; and he has had before him the example of his father, who lived his long life in the closest communion with God, while not neglecting his duties to the world, or allowing his keen interest in all human affairs to suffer any abatement

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Charles Sherlock Fillmore (August 22, 1854 ? July 5, 1948) founded Unity, a church within the New Thought movement, with his wife, Myrtle Page Fillmore, in 1889. He became known as an American mystic for his contributions to spiritualist interpretations of Biblical scripture.

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The Post Office (Bengali: Dak Ghar) is a 1912 play by Rabindranath Tagore. It concerns Amal, a child confined to his adopted uncle's home by an incurable disease. W. Andrew Robinson and Krishna Dutta note that the play "continues to occupy a special place in [Tagore's] reputation, both within Bengal and in the wider world.­"[1] It was written in four days.­[2]

Amal stands in Madhav's courtyard and talks to passers-­by, and asks in particular about the places they go. The construction of a new post office nearby prompts the imaginative Amal to fantasize about receiving a letter from the King or being his postman. The village headman mocks Amal, and pretends the illiterate child has received a letter from the king promising that his royal physician will come to attend him. The physician really does come, with a herald to announce the imminent arrival of the king; Amal, however, falls asleep (or dies) as Sudha comes to bring him flowers.

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Rabindranath Tagore sobriquet Gurudev, was aBengali polymath who reshaped his region's literature and music. Author of Gitanjali and its "profoundly sensitive, fresh and beautiful verse", he became the first non-­European to win the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1913. In translation his poetry was viewed as spiritual and mercurial, his seemingly mesmeric personality, flowing hair, and other-­worldly dress earned him a prophet-­like reputation in the West.

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KABÎR'S POEMS I I. 13. mo ko kahân dhûnro bande O servant, where dost thou seek Me? Lo! I am beside thee. I am neither in temple nor in mosque: I am neither in Kaaba nor in Kailash: Neither am I in rites and ceremonies, nor in Yoga and renunciation. If thou art a true seeker, thou shalt at once see Me: thou shalt meet Me in a moment of time. Kabîr says, "O Sadhu! God is the breath of all breath.­" II I. 16. Santan jât na pûcho nirguniyân It is needless to ask of a saint the caste to which he belongs; For the priest, the warrior. the tradesman, and all the thirty-­six castes, alike are seeking for God. It is but folly to ask what the caste of a saint may be; The barber has sought God, the washerwoman, and the carpenter-- Even Raidas was a seeker after God. The Rishi Swapacha was a tanner by caste. Hindus and Moslems alike have achieved that End, where remains no mark of distinction.­< Hindus and Moslems alike have achieved that End, where remains no mark of distinction.

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I have always been very fond of poetry and try to read as many poets from across the globe as I can. Rabindranath Tagore has been an inspiration since I was a child and at home, we usually read out from the English translations of his Original Bengali works. My grandfather had the finest collection of his works, which have become out of either print today or are difficult to find.

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In the course of his wanderings, in fulfilment of a vow of penance, Arjuna came to Manipur. There he saw Chitrangada, the beautiful daughter of Chitravahana, the king of the country. Smitten with her charms, he asked the king for the hand of his daughter in marriage.

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Books of Rabindranath Tagore