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92 books of L. T. Meade

pubOne.­info thank you for your continued support and wish to present you this new edition. Haddo Court had been a great school for girls for many generations. In fact, for considerably over a century the Court had descended from mother to daughter, who invariably, whatever her husband's name, took the name of Haddo when she became mistress of the school. The reigning mistress might sometimes be unmarried, sometimes the reverse; but she was always, in the true sense of the word, a noble, upright, generous sort of woman, and one slightly in advance of her generation. There had never been anything low or mean known about the various head mistresses of Haddo Court. The school had grown with the times. From being in the latter days of the eighteenth century a rambling, low old-­fashioned house with mullioned windows and a castellated roof, it had gradually increased in size and magnificence; until now, when this story opens, it was one of the most imposing mansions in the county.

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L. T. Meade was the pseudonym of Elizabeth Thomasina Meade Smith (1854–1914), a prolific writer of girls' stories. She was born in Bandon, County Cork, Ireland, daughter of Rev. R. T. Meade, of Nohoval, County Cork. She later moved to London, where she married Alfred Toulmin Smith in September, 1879. -­wikipedia

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Finally available, a high quality book of the original classic edition of Wild Heather. It was previously published by other bona fide publishers, and is now, after many years, back in print. This is a new and freshly published edition of this culturally important work by L. T. Meade, which is now, at last, again available to you. Get the PDF and EPUB NOW as well. Included in your purchase you have Wild Heather in EPUB AND PDF format to read on any tablet, eReader, desktop, laptop or smartphone simultaneous - Get it NOW. Enjoy this classic work today. These selected paragraphs distill the contents and give you a quick look inside Wild Heather: Look inside the book: 'Well, to be sure,­' said the woman, looking me all over from top to toe; 'I don't seem to know you, little miss, but there's no harm in me taking you as far as the station, and the next train will be due in a very few minutes, so we'll have to go as fast as possible.­' ...­I told him once again how I ran away and how I . . .

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L. T. Meade was the pseudonym of Elizabeth Thomasina Meade Smith (1854–1914), a prolific writer of girls' stories. She was born in Bandon, County Cork, Ireland, daughter of Rev. R. T. Meade, of Nohoval, County Cork. She later moved to London, where she married Alfred Toulmin Smith in September, 1879. -­wikipedia

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L. T. Meade was the pseudonym of Elizabeth Thomasina Meade Smith (1854–1914), a prolific writer of girls' stories. She was born in Bandon, County Cork, Ireland, daughter of Rev. R. T. Meade, of Nohoval, County Cork. She later moved to London, where she married Alfred Toulmin Smith in September, 1879. -­wikipedia

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L. T. Meade was the pseudonym of Elizabeth Thomasina Meade Smith (1854–1914), a prolific writer of girls' stories. She was born in Bandon, County Cork, Ireland, daughter of Rev. R. T. Meade, of Nohoval, County Cork. She later moved to London, where she married Alfred Toulmin Smith in September, 1879. -­wikipedia

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Wild Heather is about Heather Grayson, an attractive character of the story. Her trials, tribulations, and also her conquests and triumphs will absorb the reader from the very first chapter until the last.

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The girls, aged respectively twelve and nine, were seated, one on a rustic stile, The Other on The grass at her feet; a background of splendid forest trees threw Their slight and childish figures into strong relief. Rachel’s hat was tossed on The ground and Kitty’s parasol lay unopened by her side. The sun was sending slanting rays through The trees, and some of These rays fell on Kitty’s bright hair and lit up Rachel’s dark little gypsy face. “Aunt Grizel is coming,­” said Kitty, and immediately she put on a proper and demure expression. Rachel, drawn up short in The midst of a very exciting narrative, looked slightly defiant and began to whistle in a boyish manner. Aunt Griselda was seen approaching down a long straight avenue overshadowed by forest trees of beech and oak; she held her parasol well up, and her face was Further protected from any passing gleams of sunlight by a large poke-­bonnet. She was a slender old lady, with a graceful and dignified appearance. Aunt Griselda . . .

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Books of L. T. Meade