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24 books of Laozi

• Translated, with Commentary, by Philip J. Ivanhoe.­Philip J. Ivanhoe's richly annotated translation of this classic work is accompanied by his engaging interpretation and commentary, a lucid introduction, and a Language Appendix that compares eight classic translations of the opening passage of the work and invites the reader to consider the principles upon which each was rendered.­"Why another translation of the Daodejing? Ivanhoe manages, unlike some scholarly translators, to respect the intellectual, social, philosophic, historic, and spiritual integrity of the text and to put the text into a readable, insightful, and elegant English rendering of the most famous of the early Daoist classics.­"
—John Berthrong, Boston University School of Theology"P. J. Ivanhoe approaches the Daodejing with great enthusiasm and love of subject, much philosophical insight, linguistic sensitivity, and philological sophistication.­"
—Richard John Lynn, University of TorontoPhilip J. Ivanhoe is . . .

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• Translated, with Commentary, by Philip J. Ivanhoe.­Philip J. Ivanhoe's richly annotated translation of this classic work is accompanied by his engaging interpretation and commentary, a lucid introduction, and a Language Appendix that compares eight classic translations of the opening passage of the work and invites the reader to consider the principles upon which each was rendered.­"Why another translation of the Daodejing? Ivanhoe manages, unlike some scholarly translators, to respect the intellectual, social, philosophic, historic, and spiritual integrity of the text and to put the text into a readable, insightful, and elegant English rendering of the most famous of the early Daoist classics.­"
—John Berthrong, Boston University School of Theology"P. J. Ivanhoe approaches the Daodejing with great enthusiasm and love of subject, much philosophical insight, linguistic sensitivity, and philological sophistication.­"
—Richard John Lynn, University of TorontoPhilip J. Ivanhoe is . . .

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Il Tao Te Ching (in Wade-­Giles) o Dàodéjīng (pinyin), è un'opera breve di soli 5.­000 caratteri. Si compone di ottantuno capitoletti e per la sua difficoltà di interpretazione continua ad essere studiato e commentato. Il libro è oscurissimo, criptico, a volte ambiguo. A ciò si aggiunge il sospetto che le tavolette dalle quali era composto, mal rilegate, si slegassero frequentemente, in modo tale che blocchi di caratteri si mescolassero nel tramandarlo: da qui il sorgere di numerose questioni critiche e interpretative. Il testo permette di affrontare diversi piani di lettura e d'interpretazione.

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Dao De Jing is one of the richest, most suggestive, and most popular works of philosophy and literature. Composed in China between the late sixth and the late fourth centuries b.­c., its enigmatic verses have inspired artists, philosophers, poets, religious thinkers, and general readers down to our own times. This new translation, both revelatory and authentic, captures much of the beauty and nuance of the original work. In an extensive and accessible commentary to his translation, Moss Roberts reveals new depths of Dao De Jing.­This edition is distinguished by the literary quality of the translation, its new renderings for a number of the stanzas, and by Roberts's knowledgeable contextualizations. Utilizing recently discovered manuscripts and Chinese scholarship based on them, he is able to shed new light on the work's historical and philosophical contexts. This translation shows that Dao De Jing is far more than a work of personal inspiration; it is also a work of universal scope . . .

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Lao-­tze was born in the hamlet Ch‘u-­Jan (Good Man's Bend), Li-­Hsiang (Grinding County), K‘u-­Hien (Thistle District), of Ch‘u (Bramble land). His family was the Li gentry (Li meaning Plum). His proper name was Er (Ear), his posthumous title Po-­Yang (Prince Positive), his appellation Tan (Long-­lobed). In Cheu (the State of Everywhere) he was in charge of the secret archives as state historian.

Confucius went to Cheu in order to consult Lao-­tze on the rules of propriety.

[When Confucius, speaking of propriety, praised the sages of antiquity], Lao-­tze said: "The men of whom you speak, Sir, together with their bones, have mouldered. Their words alone are still extant. If a noble man finds his time he rises, but if he does not find his time he drifts like a roving-­plant and wanders about. I observe that the wise merchant hides his treasures deeply as if he were poor. The noble man of perfect virtue assumes an attitude as though he were stupid. Let go, Sir, your proud airs, your many . . .

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Lao-­tze was born in the hamlet Ch‘u-­Jan (Good Man's Bend), Li-­Hsiang (Grinding County), K‘u-­Hien (Thistle District), of Ch‘u (Bramble land). His family was the Li gentry (Li meaning Plum). His proper name was Er (Ear), his posthumous title Po-­Yang (Prince Positive), his appellation Tan (Long-­lobed). In Cheu (the State of Everywhere) he was in charge of the secret archives as state historian.

Confucius went to Cheu in order to consult Lao-­tze on the rules of propriety.

[When Confucius, speaking of propriety, praised the sages of antiquity], Lao-­tze said: "The men of whom you speak, Sir, together with their bones, have mouldered. Their words alone are still extant. If a noble man finds his time he rises, but if he does not find his time he drifts like a roving-­plant and wanders about. I observe that the wise merchant hides his treasures deeply as if he were poor. The noble man of perfect virtue assumes an attitude as though he were stupid. Let go, Sir, your proud airs, your many . . .

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