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34 books of George Jacob Holyoake

The term "secularism" was first used by the British writer George Jacob Holyoake in 1851.­[6] Although the term was new, the general notions of freethought on which it was based had existed throughout history. In particular, early secular ideas involving the separation of philosophy and religion can be traced back to Ibn Rushd (Averroes) and the Averroism school of philosophy.­[7][8] Holyoake invented the term "secularism" to describe his views of promoting a social order separate from religion, without actively dismissing or criticizing religious belief. An agnostic himself, Holyoake argued that "Secularism is not an argument against Christianity, it is one independent of it. It does not question the pretensions of Christianity; it advances others. Secularism does not say there is no light or guidance elsewhere, but maintains that there is light and guidance in secular truth, whose conditions and sanctions exist independently, and act forever. Secular knowledge is manifestly that . . .

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Author: George Jacob HolyoakePublisher: Trübner & co.­Year published: 1884Book contributor: University of MichiganLanguage: English1 downloads in the last monthDownload Ebook: (PDF) (EPUB)

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Author: George Jacob HolyoakeYear published: 1905Book contributor: University of MichiganLanguage: English1 downloads in the last monthDownload Ebook: (PDF) (EPUB)

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Author: George Jacob HolyoakePublisher: J. WatsonYear published: 1845Book contributor: University of Wisconsin - MadisonLanguage: English1 downloads in the last monthDownload Ebook: (PDF) (EPUB)

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The events, more than half of which are newly narrated in this ‘History,­’ are recited from recollection. It is not pretended that all the conversations took place with the brevity with which they are given here. In the lapse of eight years there is much which I must have forgotten; but what I have told I distinctly remember, and the actors living will not, I think, contradict it. As, by a creditable improvement in English law, the recommencement of prosecutions for (ir)religious opinion can originate with the Attorney-­General alone, I have ventured to hope that, if this narrative should fall into the hands of that officer for the time being, it may present some reasons to him why this ‘Last Trial by Jury for Atheism’ should be the last.

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Books of George Jacob Holyoake