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258 books of Aristotle

Aristotle was born in Stagira in north Greece, the son of Nichomachus, the court physician to the Macedonian royal family. He was trained first in medicine, and then in 367 he was sent to Athens to study philosophy with Plato. He stayed at Plato's Academy until about 347. Though a brilliant pupil, Aristotle opposed some of Plato's teachings, and when Plato died, Aristotle was not appointed head of the Academy. After leaving Athens, Aristotle spent some time traveling, and possibly studying biology, in Asia Minor (now Turkey) and its islands. He returned to Macedonia in 338 to tutor Alexander the Great; after Alexander conquered Athens, Aristotle returned to Athens and set up a school of his own, known as the Lyceum. After Alexander's death, Athens rebelled against Macedonian rule, and Aristotle's political situation became precarious. To avoid being put to death, he fled to the island of Euboea, where he died soon after.

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Probably written by a pupil of Aristotle, it is the first history of Athens as a model democracy, how it came into existence, and how it operated in practice.

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Aristotle was an ancient Greek philosopher who set up a rival academy, The Lyceum, to challenge Plato’s Academy. Aristotle wrote influential works in a range of disciplines - politics, physics, ethics, economics - and had a profound impact on Western thought.

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Hippias of Elis travels throughout the Greek world practicing and teaching the art of making beautiful speeches. On a rare visit to Athens, he meets Socrates who questions him about the nature of his art. Socrates is curious about how Hippias would define beauty. They agree that “beauty makes all beautiful things beautiful,­” but when Socrates presses him to say precisely what he means, Hippias is unable to deliver such a definition. The more Socrates probes, the more absurd the responses from Hippias become. This is one of Plato’s best comedies and one of his finest efforts at examining the difference between particular things and universals.

Aristotle’s Poetics is known for its definition and analysis of tragedy, but it also applies to truth and beauty as they are manifested in the other arts. In our age when the natural and social sciences have dominated the quest for truth, it is helpful to consider why Aristotle claimed that “poetry is more philosophical and more significant . . .

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Containing his Complete Masterpiece and Family Physician; his Experienced Midwife, his Book of Problems and his Remarks on Physiognomy Contents The Athenian Constitution The Categories The Works of Aristotle the Famous Philosopher THE MIDWIFE'S VADE-­MECUM A PRIVATE LOOKING GLASS FOR THE FEMALE SEX THE FAMILY PHYSICIAN THE EXPERIENCED MIDWIFE PROPER AND SAFE REMEDIES ARISTOTLE'S BOOK OF PROBLEMS THE SECRETS OF NATURE RELATING TO PHYSIOGNOMY The Poetics The Ethics of Aristotle Politics: A Treatise on Government Ethics - The Ethics of Aristotle is one half of a single treatise of which his Politics is the other half. Both deal with one and the same subject. This subject is what Aristotle calls in one place the "philosophy of human affairs;­" but more frequently Political or Social Science. In the two works taken together we have their author's whole theory of human conduct or practical activity, that is, of all human activity which is not directed merely to knowledge or truth. The . . .

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Aristotle's works have influenced science, religion, and philosophy for nearly two thousand years. He could be thought of as the father of logical thought. Aristotle wrote: "There is nothing in the intellect that was not first in the senses.­" He wrote that everything that is learned in life is learned through sensory perception. Aristotle was the first to establish the founding principle of logic. The great writer Dante called Aristotle "The Master of those who know.­" The Roman writer Cicero viewed Aristotle's work so highly that he called them "A river of gold". "Again does it follow that being, if one, is motionless? Why should it not move, the whole of it within itself as parts of it do which are unities e.­g. this water. Please Note: This book is easy to read in true text, not scanned images that can sometimes be difficult to decipher. The Microsoft eBook has a contents page linked to the chapter headings for easy navigation. The Adobe eBook has bookmarks at chapter headings . . .

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Books of Aristotle