Author rate:
Page 1 from 3

27 books of Opie Percival Read

Author: Opie Percival ReadPublisher: Rand, McNallyYear published: 1899Book contributor: New York Public LibraryLanguage: English2 downloads in the last monthDownload Ebook: (PDF) (EPUB)

Book rate:
18 downloads
  read online  

Lying along the Arkansas River, a few miles below Little Rock, there is a broad strip of country that was once the domain of a lordly race of men. They were not lordly in the sense of conquest; no rusting armor hung upon their walls; no ancient blood-­stains blotched their stairways?­there were no skeletons in dungeons deep beneath the banquet hall. But in their own opinion they were just as great as if they had possessed these gracious marks of medieval distinction. Their country was comparatively new, but their fathers came mostly from Virginia and their whisky came wholly from Kentucky. Their cotton brought a high price in the Liverpool market, their daughters were celebrated for beauty, and their sons could hold their own with the poker players that traveled up and down the Mississippi River. The slave trade had been abolished, and, therefore, what remained of slavery was right; and in proof of it the pulpit contributed its argument. Negro preachers with wives scattered . . .

Book rate:
17 downloads
  read online  

Example in this ebook

CHAPTER I.
THE STUDENT AND THE ORATOR.

When John Elbridge retired from the bench, the newspapers said that he had been an honorable judge. He was not a pioneer, but had come to Chicago at a time which we now call an early day, when churches rang their bells where now there is a jungle of trade, when the legs of the Giant of the West were in the ache of "growing pains;­" at a time when none but the most visionary dreamed that a mud-­hole full of old boots, dead rats, cats, dogs, could ever be worth a million of dollars. Elbridge came from Maryland, with a scant wardrobe, a lawyer's diploma, and the confident ambition of youth. It was not long before he formed a copartnership with a young man named Bodney, a Kentuckian, in whose mind still lived the chimes of Henry Clay's bells—a memory that not so much fitted him to the law as it atuned him to oratory; but in those days the bar could be eloquent without inviting the pitying smile which means, "Oh, yes, . . .

Book rate:
6 downloads
Book rate:
2 downloads
Book rate:
0 downloads
Book rate:
0 downloads
  read online  
Book rate:
2 downloads
  read online  

Comments

No comments yet

Books of Opie Percival Read