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63 books of James Legge

Author: James LeggePublisher: TrübnerYear published: 1877Book contributor: Harvard UniversityLanguage: English1 downloads in the last monthDownload Ebook: (PDF) (EPUB)

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Chinese classic texts, or Chinese canonical texts, (Chinese: and#20856;­and#31821;; pinyin: diand#462;­nj?­) today often refer to the pre-­Qin Chinese texts, especially the Neo-­Confucian titles of Four Books and Five Classics (and#22235;­and#26360;­and#20116;­and#32147;­), a selection of short books and chapters from the voluminous collection called the Thirteen Classics. All of these pre-­Qin texts were written in classical Chinese. As canons they are collectively referred to as jing (and#32147;­).­[1]

More broadly speaking, Chinese classic texts may refer to texts, be they written in vernacular Chinese or in classical Chinese, that existed before 1912, when the last imperial Chinese dynasty, the Qing Dynasty, fell. These can include shi (and#21490;, historical works), zi (and#23376;, philosophical works belonging to schools of thought other than the Confucian, but also works of agriculture, medicine, mathematics, astronomy, divination, art criticism, and all sorts of miscellaneous . . .

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A collection of treatises on the role of propriety or ceremonial usage.

ABOUT CONFUCIANISM:
Humanism is at the core in Confucianism. A simple way to appreciate Confucian thought is to consider it as being based on varying levels of honesty, and a simple way to understand Confucian thought is to examine the world by using the logic of humanity. In practice, the primary foundation and function of Confucianism is as an ethical philosophy to be practiced by all the members of a society. Confucian ethics is characterized by the promotion of virtues, encompassed by the Five Constants, or the Wuchang, extrapolated by Confucian scholars during the Han Dynasty. The five virtues are Ren (Humaneness), Yi (Righteousness or Justice), Li (Propriety or Etiquette), Zhi (Knowledge), Xin (Integrity). They are accompanied by the classical Sizi with four virtues: Zhong (Loyalty), Xiao (Filial piety), Jie (Continency), Yi (Righteousness). There are still many other elements, such as Cheng (honesty), . . .

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A historic best seller and the second most translated book after the Bible. The Tao Te Ching (or Dao De Jing/King) is an ancient Chinese text that literally means "clazzic" "way" of "virtue,­" and is a cornerstone of philosophical Taoism. It is attributed to Lao Tzu or "Old Master,­" who lived during the 6th century BC, and who was a record-­keeper at the court of the Zhou Dynasty. This text is translated in English by James Legge. This short text is broken up into 81 "chapters" that read like little epigrams or poems, which can be easily read in a few hours. The simple yet powerful philosophy of Taoism can be contemplated in the image of the Yin Yang symbol: each side of a duality while an opposite also contains its opposite, as in dark/light, male/female, etc. These enduring philosophical poems are graceful and beautiful, and deserve to be memorized.

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I wrote out a translation of the Yî King, embracing both the Text and the Appendixes, in 1854 and 1855; and have to acknowledge that when the manuscript was completed, I knew very little about the scope and method of the book. I laid the volumes containing the result of my labour aside, and hoped, believed indeed, that the light would by and by dawn, and that I should one day get hold of a clue that would guide me to a knowledge of the mysterious classic. Before that day came, the translation was soaked, in 1870, for more than a month in water of the Red Sea. By dint of careful manipulation it was recovered so as to be still legible; but it was not till 1874 that I began to be able to give to the book the prolonged attention necessary to make it reveal its secrets. Then for the first time I got hold, as I believe, of the clue, and found that my toil of twenty years before was of no service at all. What had tended more than anything else to hide the nature of the book from my . . .

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Books of James Legge