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33 books of Kakuzo Okakura

Tea began as a medicine and grew into a beverage. In China, in the eighth century, it entered the realm of poetry as one of the polite amusements. The fifteenth century saw Japan ennoble it into a religion of aestheticism - Teaism. Teaism is a cult founded on the adoration of the beautiful among the sordid facts of everyday existence. It inculcates purity and harmony, the mystery of mutual charity, the romanticism of the social order. It is essentially a worship of the Imperfect, as it is a tender attempt to accomplish something possible in this impossible thing we know as life. The Philosophy of Tea is not mere aestheticism in the ordinary acceptance of the term, for it expresses conjointly with ethics and religion our whole point of view about man and nature. It is hygiene, for it enforces cleanliness; it is economics, for it shows comfort in simplicity rather than in the complex and costly; it is moral geometry, inasmuch as it defines our sense of proportion to the universe. . . .

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The Book of Tea (茶の本 Cha no Hon?­) by Okakura Kakuzō[1] (1906), is a long essay linking the role of tea (teaism) to the aesthetic and cultural aspects of Japanese life.
Addressed to a western audience, it was originally written in English and is one of the great English tea classics. Okakura had been taught at a young age to speak English and was proficient at communicating his thoughts to the Western mind. In his book, he discusses such topics as Zen and Taoism, but also the secular aspects of tea and Japanese life. The book emphasizes how Teaism taught the Japanese many things; most importantly, simplicity. Kakuzō argues that this tea-­induced simplicity affected art and architecture, and he was a long-­time student of the visual arts. He ends the book with a chapter on Tea Masters, and spends some time talking about Sen no Rikyū and his contribution to the Japanese Tea Ceremony.
According to Tomonobu Imamichi, Heidegger’s concept of Dasein in Sein und Zeit was inspired — . . .

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In 1906 in turn-­of-­the century Boston, a small, esoteric book about tea was written with the intention of being read aloud in the famous salon of Isabella Gardner. It was authored by Okakura Kakuzo, a Japanese philosopher, art expert, and curator. Little known at the time, Kakuzo would emerge as one of the great thinkers of the early 20th century, a genius who was insightful, witty and greatly responsible for bridging Western and Eastern cultures. Nearly a century later, Kakuzo's The Book of Tea is still beloved the world over. The Book of Tea is a delightful cup of enlightenment from a man far ahead of his time.

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The Book of Tea was written by Okakura Kakuzo in the early 20th century. It was first published in 1906, and has since been republished many times.

In the book, Kakuzo introduces the term Teaism and how Tea has affected nearly every aspect of Japanese culture, thought, and life. The book is accessibile to Western audiences because Kakuzo was taught at a young age to speak English; and spoke it all his life, becoming proficient at communicating his thoughts to the Western Mind. In his book, he discusses such topics as Zen and Taoism, but also the secular aspects of Tea and Japanese life. The book emphasises how Teaism taught the Japanese many things; most importantly, simplicity. Kakuzo argues that this tea-­induced simplicity affected art and architecture, and he was a long-­time student of the visual arts. He ends the book with a chapter on Tea Masters, and spends some time talking about Sen no Rikyu and his contribution to the Japanese Tea Ceremony.

According to Tomonobu . . .

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The Book of Tea was written by Okakura Kakuzo in the early 20th century. It was first published in 1906, and has since been republished many times.­In the book, Kakuzo introduces the term Teaism and how Tea has affected nearly every aspect of Japanese culture, thought, and life. The book is accessibile to Western audiences because Kakuzo was taught at a young age to speak English; and spoke it all his life, becoming proficient at communicating his thoughts to the Western Mind. In his book, he discusses such topics as Zen and Taoism, but also the secular aspects of Tea and Japanese life. The book emphasises how Teaism taught the Japanese many things; most importantly, simplicity. Kakuzo argues that this tea-­induced simplicity affected art and architecture, and he was a long-­time student of the visual arts. He ends the book with a chapter on Tea Masters, and spends some time talking about Sen no Rikyu and his contribution to the Japanese Tea Ceremony. Excerpted from Wikipedia, the . . .

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"The long isolation of Japan from the rest of the world, so conducive to introspection, has been highly favourable to the development of Teaism. Our home and habits, costume and cuisine, porcelain, lacquer, painting-­our very literature-­all have been subject to its influence. No student of Japanese culture could ever ignore its presence. It has permeated the elegance of noble boudoirs, and entered the abode of the humble. Our peasants have learned to arrange flowers, our meanest labourer to offer his salutation to the rocks and waters. In our common parlance we speak of the man "with no tea" in him, when he is insusceptible to the serio-­comic interests of the personal drama. Again we stigmatise the untamed aesthete who, regardless of the mundane tragedy, runs riot in the springtide of emancipated emotions, as one "with too much tea" in him.­" -­The Book of Tea 1906

-­This book includes stunning ancient Japanese artwork.

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This is a short but very concise introduction to Asian art by the author of The Book of Tea. Written from a Japanese perspective, and focusing on Japanese art, one of the major themes is the relationship between spirituality, particularly Buddhism, and the evolution of Asian art.

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Okakura Kakuzō (岡倉 覚三?, February 14, 1862 – September 2, 1913) (also known as 岡倉 天心 Okakura Tenshin) was a Japanese scholar who contributed to the development of arts in Japan. Outside of Japan, he is chiefly remembered today as the author of The Book of Tea.

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La filosofia del tè non è in realtà mero estetismo, perché esprime insieme all'etica e alla religione il nostro punto di vista circa l'uomo e la natura. È igiene, poiché impone la pulizia; è economia, perché mostra il comfort nella semplicità piuttosto che nel lusso; è geometria morale, in quanto definisce il nostro ruolo nelle proporzioni dell'universo.
Rappresenta il vero spirito della democrazia Orientale trasformando tutti i suoi seguaci in aristocratici.
La nostra casa e le abitudini, il costume e la cucina, le porcellane, la pittura - la nostra stessa letteratura – tutti questi ambiti sono stati sottoposti alla sua influenza. Nessuno studente della cultura giapponese avrebbe mai potuto ignorare la sua presenza. Esso ha permeato l'eleganza dei boudoir dei nobili, ed è entrato nella dimora degli umili.

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Books of Kakuzo Okakura