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160 books of Georgette Heyer

The Black Moth (1921) is a Georgian (set around 1751) romance novel by Georgette Heyer. This was her first novel. Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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La muerte del patriarca Gregory altera la aparente tranquilidad en la elegante mansión de los Matthews. Si la avara tía Harriet no duda de que la causa fue la opulenta cena a base de pato asado y el mejor scotch, la imperiosa Gertrude exige una au...

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PROLOGUE Clad in his customary black and silver, with raven hair unpowdered and elaborately dressed, diamonds on his fingers and in his cravat, Hugh Tracy Clare Belmanoir, Duke of Andover, sat at the escritoire in the library of his town house, writing. He wore no rouge on his face, the almost unnatural pallor of which seemed designedly enhanced by a patch set beneath his right eye. Brows and lashes were black, the former slanting slightly up at the corners, but his narrow, heavy-­lidded eyes were green and strangely piercing. The thin lips curled a little, sneering, as one dead-­white hand travelled to and fro across the paper. ... but it seems that the Fair Lady has a Brother, who, finding Me Enamoured, threw down the Gauntlet. I soundly whipt the presumptuous Child, and so the Affair ends. Now, as you, My dear Frank, also took some Interest in the Lady, I write for the Express Purpose of informing You that at my Hands she has received no Hurt, nor is not like to. This I in part . . .

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Clad in his customary black and silver, with raven hair unpowdered and elaborately dressed, diamonds on his fingers and in his cravat, Hugh Tracy Clare Belmanoir, Duke of Andover, sat at the escritoire in the library of his town house, writing. He wore no rouge on his face, the almost unnatural pallor of which seemed designedly enhanced by a patch set beneath his right eye. Brows and lashes were black, the former slanting slightly up at the corners, but his narrow, heavy-­lidded eyes were green and strangely piercing. The thin lips curled a little, sneering, as one dead-­white hand travelled to and fro across the paper. ... but it seems that the Fair Lady has a Brother, who, finding Me Enamoured, threw down the Gauntlet. I soundly whipt the presumptuous Child, and so the Affair ends. Now, as you, My dear Frank, also took some Interest in the Lady, I write for the Express Purpose of informing You that at my Hands she has received no Hurt, nor is not like to. This I in part tell You . . .

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Books of Georgette Heyer