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109 books of Dorothy L. Sayers

Introduction by Mary McDermott Shideler

One of the first women to graduate from Oxford University, Dorothy Sayers pursued her goals whether or not what she wanted to do was ordinarily understood to be "feminine.­" Sayers did not devote a great deal of time to talking or writing about feminism, but she did explicitly address the issue of women's role in society in the two classic essays collected here.

Central to Sayers's reflections is the conviction that both men and women are first of all human beings and must be regarded as essentially much more alike than different. We are to be true not so much to our sex as to our humanity. The proper role of both men and women, in her view, is to find the work for which they are suited and to do it.

Though written several decades ago, these essays still offer in Sayers's piquant style a sensible and conciliatory approach to ongoing gender issues.

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The best of the golden age crime writers, praised by all the top modern writers in the field including P. D. James and Ruth Rendell, Dorothy L. Sayers created the immortal Lord Peter Wimsey. The 13th book featuring Lord Peter (the fourth novel with Harriet Vane) is the story of their interrupted honeymoon. With an introduction by Elizabeth George.
They plan to have a quiet country honeymoon. Then Lord Peter Wimsey and his bride Harriet Vane find the previous owner's body in the cellar.
Set in a country village seething with secrets and snobbery, this is Dorothy L. Sayers' last full-­length detective novel. Variously described as a love story with detective interruptions and a detective story with romantic interruptions, it lives up to both descriptions with style.

'I admire her novels ... she has great fertility of invention, ingenuity and a wonderful eye for detail' P. D. James

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This second volume of Dorothy L. Sayers covers the seven years in which the greatest detective novelist of the golden age—­and the creator of Lord Peter Wimsey—­turns away from mystery writing to become a playwright and, in turn, a controversial figure. Accused on the one hand of blasphemy, acclaimed on the other as one of the most influential lay theologians of her time, she found herself drawn into a vast network of correspondence, dealing with a wide range of social concerns. These, after all, are the years of World War II, of air-­raids, threats of invasion, rationing, lack of domestic help, congested travel, and blackouts. But there was no blackout in the creativity of Dorothy L. Sayers; in fact, this is the peak period f her creative endeavors: seventeen plays, several books, innumerable articles and talks—­and hundreds of letters. The letters reveal the context of her published words and send the reader back to them with new understanding....

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Books of Dorothy L. Sayers