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4 books of Edmund De Waal

The Ephrussis were a grand banking family, as rich and respected as the Rothschilds, who “burned like a comet” in nineteenth-­century Paris and Vienna society. Yet by the end of World War II, almost the only thing remaining of their vast empire was a collection of 264 wood and ivory carvings, none of them larger than a matchbox.­The renowned ceramicist Edmund de Waal became the fifth generation to inherit this small and exquisite collection of netsuke. Entranced by their beauty and mystery, he determined to trace the story of his family through the story of the collection.­The netsuke—drunken monks, almost-­ripe plums, snarling tigers—were gathered by Charles Ephrussi at the height of the Parisian rage for all things Japanese. Charles had shunned the place set aside for him in the family business to make a study of art, and of beautiful living. An early supporter of the Impressionists, he appears, oddly formal in a top hat, in Renoir’s Luncheon of the Boating Party. Marcel Proust . . .

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The definitive illustrated edition of the international bestsellerTwo hundred and sixty-­four Japanese wood and ivory carvings, none of them larger than a matchbox: Edmund de Waal was entranced when he first encountered the collection in his great-­uncle Iggie’s Tokyo apartment. When he later inherited the netsuke, they unlocked a far more dramatic story than he could ever have imagined.­From a burgeoning empire in Odessa to fin de siècle Paris, from occupied Vienna to postwar Tokyo, de Waal traces the netsuke’s journey through generations of his remarkable family against the backdrop of a tumultuous century. With sumptuous photographs of the netsuke collection and full-­color images from de Waal’s family archive, the illustrated edition of The Hare with Amber Eyes transforms a deeply intimate saga into a work of visual art.

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Un'elegante vetrina nella casa londinese di Edmund de Waal contiene 264 sculture giapponesi di avorio, o legno, non più grandi di una scatola di fiammiferi, raffiguranti divinità, personaggi di ogni tipo, animali, piante. La vetrina è aperta, e i piccoli figli di de Waal possono estrarre i netsuke - così si chiamano i minuscoli oggetti - e giocarci. Come facevano, ha scoperto l'autore, i piccoli figli di Viktor e Emmy von Ephrussi, suoi bisnonni, nel boudoir della madre, in un fastoso palazzo viennese della Ringstrasse, un secolo fa. Prima che Hitler entrasse in trionfo a Vienna e avessero inizio le persecuzioni e i saccheggi nelle case degli ebrei. Ebrei di Odessa erano appunto gli Ephrussi, commercianti di cereali e poi banchieri ricchi e famosi quanto i Rothschild, con ville e palazzi sparsi in tutta Europa. Quello di Vienna, dove i netsuke arrivano nel 1899 da Parigi - dono di nozze ai cugini di Charles Ephrussi, famoso collezionista, mecenate, storico dell'arte, amico di . . .

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Charles Ephrussi, qui inspira à Proust le personnage de Swann, fut le patriarche d'une des plus grandes familles de la bourgeoisie juive du XIXe siècle. Ami de Schnitzler et d'Hofmannsthal, ce banquier originaire d'Odessa qui vécut entre Paris et ...

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Books of Edmund De Waal