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43 books of Robert Grey Reynolds Jr

Colleen Marie Applegate/Shauna Grant underwent a personality change during her final year in high school in Farmington, Minnesota. Replacing the wholesome, All-­American girl was someone her parents did not know or understand. Colleen began to smoke and use marijuana. She dropped her regular friends for a different crowd, and also found a new boyfriend. She tried suicide before leaving for California. There she soon entered the adult modeling and X-­rated film industry. In my e-­book I have done an extensive ancestral profile of her family, the Applegates and Lees. Her heritage was Norwegian, German, and Dutch. Born in California, Colleen/Shauna was the product of people from North Dakota, Minnesota, and Nebraska. They came to Los Angeles County, California in the early 20th century. The Applegates and Lees also settled in Riverside and Orange County, CA. After Colleen was born her dad, Phillip Applegate, moved back to Minnesota. However, Colleen became bored with life there. She . . .

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The novelette's protagonist is Colin Freeman, an American photographer from Appalachia. He is assigned to visually transmit images of the agony of a tragedy near Calcutta. Along the way the reader experiences the photographer's prurient interests, as well as some of his genuine knowledge of India's people and customs. All of the characters are college age or older. I think that readers will be interested in the manner in which the photographer's inhibitions drive his voyeurism. They may also venture to guess about the origins of his vicarious behavior. His expertise about vintage cameras is another topic of interest. It is certainly a popular hobby of many prospective readers and collectors.

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The history of a railroad includes the personal histories of the individuals who worked for it. In 1880 the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad in Topeka, Kansas employed executives, clerks, yard superintendents, conductors, supervisors, etc. Most of the people who worked for the railroad came from New England, New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. Others moved to Topeka from Ohio and Illinois in the Midwest. Several came directly from England and Scotland. The story of the A.­T.­& S.­F.­R.­R.­in Topeka follows in line with the trek of U.­S. migration from east to west. I have utilized ancestral records which will assist individuals working on their own genealogy projects. Readers can use the research I have done to complete their own projects on family trees, Kansas and railroad history, etc. I have supplemented the directory with historic photos which should provide more of a feel of what it was like to live in Topeka in the late 19th century. Railroads have left a deep imprint on . . .

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Benny Kauff was a major league hitter, fielder, and base runner of great talent. He played with the Indianapolis Hoosiers and Brooklyn Tip-­Tops, of the short-­lived Federal League, in 1914 and 1915. Often compared to Hall of Famer Ty Cobb, Kauff was a multi-­talented outfielder, who could hit for power. His career was abbreviated because of a car theft arrest in late 1919. Benny was later acquitted of the charges by a grand jury in New York City. However, baseball commissioner Landis effectively "boycotted" the slugger. Landis told him not to play baseball for the New York Giants again. Benny had been signed by the John McGraw managed Giants after the Federal League folded following 1915. Various court appeals failed, and Kauff was never allowed to play baseball again. He was active for only a portion of the 1920 regular season. My E-­book discusses Kauff's heritage, his parents, ancestral facts, etc., drawn from U.­S. Censuses of Pomeroy, Ohio. I have acquired an immense amount of . . .

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My E-­Book looks at George Washington Keefe from the perspective of a player and family member. He was the son of a diabled Pennsylvania Union Civil War soldier. Charles Keefe was a cabinetmaker who drew a pension after being wounded as a reservist in combat with the Pennsylvania infantry. His son, George pitched for three seasons for the Washington Nationals. It was a different time in baseball history. The Detroit Wolverines played in the National League. Baltimore's club was also in the N.­L., and the Giants were in New York instead of San Francisco. Baseball was fast becoming the most followed sport in America. Keefe was one of three brothers. He lived all of his life in Washington, D.­C., except for when he played stints in the minor leagues. He was treated in 1889 for addiction to "intoxicants". Keefe died in obscurity, working for meager wages at a high school in the Washingtton, DC area. It was one of several menial jobs he held after his baseball career ended. My E-­Book is . . .

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In 1872 Chicago was just recovering from the awful tragedy caused by the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, i.­e. a conflagration that burned from October 8-­10, 1871. Steam engines, antiques by modern standards, were sorely tested in controlling fires that often burned uncontrolled for hours and days. The earliest hook and ladder fire truck was two years in the future. My directory lists the names, addresses, and business affiliations of firemen who worked in Chicago in 1872. Many of these men were employed by railroads. Some of the railways still exist, like the Illinois Central. Lots of them went out of business before the end of the 19th century, or early in the 20th century. Among these were the Pittsburgh Ft. Wayne & Chicago and the Chicago & Alton Railroads.­Various steam engines like the Long John and Jacob Rehm were property of the city of Chicago. My directory records the firemen who were assigned to the various fire engines. I hope that the reference I am publishing will be . . .

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Payola involved the Federal Communications Commission, the Federal Trade Commission, celebrity disc jockeys like Alan Freed and Dick Clark, and the United States House of Representatives and the U.­S. Senate. American President Dwight Eisenhower asked his attorney general to look into the matter following revelations made by quiz show contestant Charles Van Doren. Van Doren claimed that he was fed answers when he became a winner on the popular quiz show "Twenty One". Payola investigations lasted for most of 1960, after radio and television stations were directed to send lists of their employees who had taken payola bribes in return for playing the songs published by individual record companies. The attrition cost many djs like Freed their jobs. Dick Clark was made to give up copyrights that he owned in music publishing. Clark also accepted the resignation of Tony Mammarella, his American Bandstand producer. A primary issue was the amount of authority which government agencies like . . .

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Lynne Baggett's name is obscure to all but the most avid Hollywood trivia buffs. She is most well known for her marriage to "On The Waterfront" producer, Sam Spiegel. Yet her life is important because of the questions it raises. Baggett was about thirty-­five years old when she committed suicide in 1960. A car she borrowed from actor George Tobias (Mr. Kravits on "Bewitched") injured a number of boys in 1954, when Lynne hit a car they were riding in, at a Los Angeles intersection. Unfortunately, one of them died. Baggett fled the accident and turned herself in three days later. She was later jailed for hit-­and-­run. One of the uncertainties about Lynne is whether a childhood head injury affected her in later life. She was given encephalographs both before and after her car wreck. Lynne was being treated for peripheral neuritis when she died, and had only recently been a patient in a sanitarium. The New York Times obituary stated that she was paralyzed from her knees down. Was her . . .

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Mary Rogers and her mother, Phebe, came to New York City following the financial panic of 1837. Phebe lost her second husband and also her most important source of economic support, i.­e. Daniel and James Rogers. Both men were killed in shipwrecks. Daniel died on the Mississippi River and James in Long Island Sound. Phebe and Mary came to the teeming metropolis of New York City to better their fortunes. Mary went to work at a tobacco emporium operated by John Anderson, a Boston native. Only 21 when she was murdered in 1841, Mary Cecilia Rogers became a fixture of admiration among men who frequented the tobacco emporium. Many prominent men of the early 19th century stopped in to purchase cigars on a daily basis. Among the most noted of these were James Fennimore Cooper, Washington Irving, and Edgar Alan Poe. These literary figures were joined by newspaper publishers, i.­e. James Gordon Bennett and Horace Greeley, who published the New York Tribune and Herald. The intense admiration . . .

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Jake Hehl, the subject of my e-­book, was a German-­American athlete from Brooklyn's Williamsburg section. He was a standout all-­around athlete at Brooklyn Prep High School. Hehl's father was a bartender, whose parents were native Germans. Jake married a German-­American woman and, in later years, worked in his father's profession. Herman Charles "Jake" Hehl was a versatile sports performer. When his baseball career ended, around 1930, he moved on to bowling. In the 1930s and early 1940s his bowling achievements were chronicled in numerous Brooklyn Eagle newspaper articles. I became interested in Jake Hehl, because he pitched only one inning in major league baseball. Delving into his background, I found more than enough newspaper articles, ancestry records, and statistics from various internet websites, to write extensively about his life. Readers of biography and Brooklyn history, as well as researchers of German ancestry, will be interested in this E-­book. It's unfortunate that . . .

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Books of Robert Grey Reynolds Jr