Page 1 from 1

3 books of Gilles Saint-Paul

Karl Marx predicted a world in which technical innovation would increasingly devalue and impoverish workers, but other economists thought the opposite, that it would lead to increased wages and living standards--­and the economists were right. Yet in the last three decades, the market economy has been jeopardized by a worrying phenomenon: a rise in wage inequality that has left a substantial portion of the workforce worse off despite the continuing productivity growth enjoyed by the economy. examines why. Studies have firmly established a link between this worrying trend and technical change, in particular the rise of new information technologies. In, Gilles Saint-­Paul provides a synthetic theoretical analysis of the most important mechanisms by which technical progress and innovation affect the distribution of income. He discusses the conditions under which skill-­biased technical change may reduce the wages of the least skilled, and how improvements in information technology . . .

Book rate:
0 downloads

The general assumption that social policy should be utilitarian--­that society should be organized to yield the greatest level of welfare--­leads inexorably to increased government interventions. Historically, however, the science of economics has advocated limits to these interventions for utilitarian reasons and because of the assumption that people know what is best for themselves. But more recently, behavioral economics has focused on biases and inconsistencies in individual behavior. Based on these developments, governments now prescribe the foods we eat, the apartments we rent, and the composition of our financial portfolios. takes on this rise of paternalism and its dangers for individual freedoms, and examines how developments in economics and the social sciences are leading to greater government intrusion in our private lives. Gilles Saint-­Paul posits that the utilitarian foundations of individual freedom promoted by traditional economics are fundamentally flawed. When . . .

Book rate:
0 downloads

The general assumption that social policy should be utilitarian--­that society should be organized to yield the greatest level of welfare--­leads inexorably to increased government interventions. Historically, however, the science of economics has advocated limits to these interventions for utilitarian reasons and because of the assumption that people know what is best for themselves. But more recently, behavioral economics has focused on biases and inconsistencies in individual behavior. Based on these developments, governments now prescribe the foods we eat, the apartments we rent, and the composition of our financial portfolios. The Tyranny of Utility takes on this rise of paternalism and its dangers for individual freedoms, and examines how developments in economics and the social sciences are leading to greater government intrusion in our private lives. Gilles Saint-­Paul posits that the utilitarian foundations of individual freedom promoted by traditional economics are . . .

Book rate:
0 downloads

Comments

No comments yet

Books of Gilles Saint-­Paul