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1991 books of Mark Twain

"How to Tell a Story and Other Essays" is a collection of essays on various subjects by America's most famous satirist, Mark Twain. Contained in this volume you will find the following essays: How to Tell a Story, In Defense of Harriet Shelley, Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses, Travelling With a Reformer, Private History of the 'Jumping Frog' Story, Mental Telegraphy Again, What Paul Bourget Thinks of Us, A Little Note to M. Paul Bourget, The Invalid's Story, The Captain's Story, Stirring Times in Austria, Concerning the Jews, From the 'London Times' of 1904, and At the Appetite-­Cure.

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Tom Sawyer Abroad is a novel by Mark Twain published in 1894. It features Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn in a parody of Jules Verne-­esque adventure stories. In the story, Tom, Huck, and Jim set sail to Africa in a futuristic hot air balloon, where they survive encounters with lions, robbers, and fleas to see some of the world's greatest wonders, including the Pyramids and the Sphinx. Like Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer, Detective, the story is told using the first-­person narrative voice of Huck Finn.

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This collection includes three of classic American author Mark Twain's best known and beloved novels. Tom Sawyer recounts the adventures of a self-­confident but naïve boy who runs away with his friend, Huckleberry Finn, after witnessing a murder. Along the way, they have many adventures and meet interesting people. Tom's childish innocence contrasts starkly with the cruelty and hypocrisy that fill the adult world. Frequently lauded as The Great American Novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn follows young Huck Finn and the runaway slave Jim as they raft down the Mississippi River. This commentary on race, religion, and the oppression of societal norms is as spirited and controversial now as it was over a century ago. Finally, in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's, Mark Twain's comedic satire transports young a New Englander to seventh-­century Britain, juxtaposing two supposed utopias-­the romantic age of kings and the age of nineteenth-­century innovation.

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Books of Mark Twain