Author rate:
Page 6 from 100

1991 books of Mark Twain

Book rate:
37 downloads
  read online  

For deft plot, riotous inventiveness, unforgettable characters, and language that brilliantly captures the lively rhythms of American speech, no American writer comes close to Mark Twain. This sparkling anthology covers the entire span of Twain's inimitable yarn-­spinning, from his early broad comedy to the biting satire of his later years.
Every one of his sixty stories is here: ranging from the frontier humor of "The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,­" to the bitter vision of humankind in "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg,­" to the delightful hilarity of "Is He Living or Is He Dead?­" Surging with Twain's ebullient wit and penetrating insight into the follies of human nature, this volume is a vibrant summation of the career of - in the words of H.­L. Mencken - "the father of our national literature.­"

Book rate:
43 downloads
Book rate:
44 downloads
  read online  

pubOne.­info thank you for your continued support and wish to present you this new edition

Book rate:
41 downloads
  read online  

pubOne.­info thank you for your continued support and wish to present you this new edition

Book rate:
60 downloads
  read online  
Book rate:
39 downloads
  read online  

Life on the Mississippi (1883) is a memoir by Mark Twain of his days as a steamboat pilot on the Mississippi River before the American Civil War, and also a travel book, recounting his trip along the Mississippi from St. Louis to New Orleans many years after the War. The book begins with a brief history of the river as reported by Europeans and Americans, beginning with the Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto in 1542. It continues with anecdotes of Twain's training as a steamboat pilot, as the 'cub' of an experienced pilot. He describes, with great affection, the science of navigating the ever-­changing Mississippi River in a section that was first published in 1876, entitled "Old Times on the Mississippi". In the second half, Twain narrates his trip many years later on a steamboat from St. Louis to New Orleans. He describes the competition from railroads, and the new, large cities, and adds his observations on greed, gullibility, tragedy, and bad architecture. He also tells some . . .

Book rate:
49 downloads
  read online  

It seemed a doubtful scheme. He could explain us to himself--­that would be easy. That would be the same as the naturalist explaining the bug to himself. But to explain the bug to the bug--­that is quite a different matter. The bug may not know himself perfectly, but he knows himself better than the naturalist can know him, at any rate.

Book rate:
46 downloads
  read online  

My father was a St. Bernard, my mother was a collie, but I am a Presbyterian. This is what my mother told me, I do not know these nice distinctions myself. To me they are only fine large words meaning nothing. My mother had a fondness for such; she liked to say them, and see other dogs look surprised and envious, as wondering how she got so much education. But, indeed, it was not real education; it was only show: she got the words by listening in the dining-­room and drawing-­room when there was company, and by going with the children to Sunday-­school and listening there; and whenever she heard a large word she said it over to herself many times, and so was able to keep it until there was a dogmatic gathering in the neighborhood, then she would get it off, and surprise and distress them all, from pocket-­pup to mastiff, which rewarded her for all her trouble

Book rate:
49 downloads
  read online  

Comments

No comments yet

Books of Mark Twain