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2344 books of Charles Dickens

Left penniless by the death of his improvident father, young Nicholas Nickleby assumes responsibility for his mother and sister and seeks help from his Scrooge-­like Uncle Ralph. Instantly disliking Nicholas, Ralph sends him to teach in a school run by the stupidly sadistic Wackford Squeers. Nicholas decides to escape, taking with him the orphan Smike, one of Squeers’s most abused young charges, and the two embark on a series of adventurous encounters with an array of humanity’s worst and best—greedy fools, corrupt lechers, cheery innocents, and selfless benefactors.

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Charles Dickens’s first novel, (The Pickwick Papers) is a series of loosely-­related stories about Pickwick Club founder Samuel Pickwick, Esquire, and the gentlemen of his acquaintance, including Augustus Snodgrass and Tracy Tupman, and his manservant, Sam Weller. Originally published as a serial between 1836 and 1837, became a publishing phenomenon after the introduction of Sam Weller and inspired bootleg copies, joke books, and other merchandise. has been adapted for radio, stage, film, and television, and has figured in other prominent novels like. HarperPerennial Classics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.

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Libro clásico de Charles Dickens

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This Illustrated of one of the Dicken's Classics "Bleak House" writen by Charles Dickens in 1853..

A Chancery judge once had the kindness to inform me, as one of a company of some hundred and fifty men and women not labouring under any suspicions of lunacy, that the Court of Chancery, though the shining subject of much popular prejudice (at which point I thought the judge's eye had a cast in my direction), was almost immaculate. There had been, he admitted, a trivial blemish or so in its rate of progress, but this was exaggerated and had been entirely owing to the "parsimony of the public,­" which guilty public, it appeared, had been until lately bent in the most determined manner on by no means enlarging the number of Chancery judges appointed—I believe by Richard the Second, but any other king will do as well.
This seemed to me too profound a joke to be inserted in the body of this book or I should have restored it to Conversation Kenge or to Mr. Vholes, with one or other . . .

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Books of Charles Dickens