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8 books of Justus D. Doenecke

Prominent historian Justus Doenecke analyzes the personalities, leading action groups, and major congressional debates surrounding the U.­S. decision to participate in World War II.

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When war broke out in Europe in 1914, political leaders in the United States were swayed by popular opinion to remain neutral; yet less than three years later, the nation declared war on Germany. In Nothing Less Than War: A New History of America's Entry into World War I, Justus D. Doenecke examines the clash of opinions over the war during this transformative period and offers a fresh perspective on America's decision to enter World War I.­Doenecke reappraises the public and private diplomacy of President Woodrow Wilson and his closest advisors and explores in great depth the response of Congress to the war. He also investigates the debates that raged in the popular media and among citizen groups that sprang up across the country as the U.­S. economy was threatened by European blockades and as Americans died on ships sunk by German U-­boats.­The decision to engage in battle ultimately belonged to Wilson, but as Doenecke demonstrates, Wilson's choice was not made in isolation. . . .

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In Danger Undaunted, based on 338 manuscript boxes deposited in 1942 in the archives of the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and peace, conveys the logic, complexity, and passion of the anti-­interventionist movement. The book illustrates the dramatic impact this well-­organized and vocal group had on the foreign policy of the United States and on the political behavior of many of America's most prominent statesmen of the prewar years.

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Franklin D. Roosevelt led the United States through some of the most dramatic and trying foreign and domestic episodes in its history. In Debating Franklin D. Roosevelt's Foreign Policies, noted historians Justus D. Doenecke and Mark A. Stoler offer strongly differing perspectives on the Roosevelt years, finding disparate meanings from common data. Through their contrary viewpoints, supplemented by carefully chosen documents, readers are empowered to examine the issues and draw their own conclusions about FDR's controversial foreign policy.

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Between 1939-­1941, from the time that Germany invaded Poland until Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, Americans engaged in a debate as intense as any in U.­S. history. In Storm on the Horizon, prominent historian Justus D. Doenecke analyzes the personalities, leading action groups, and major congressional debates surrounding the decision to participate in World War II. Doenecke is the first scholar to place the anti-­interventionist movement in a wider framework, by focusing on its underlying military, economic, and geopolitical assumptions. Doenecke addresses key questions such as: how did the anti-­interventionists perceive the ideology, armed potential, and territorial aspirations of Germany, the British Empire, Japan, and the Soviet Union? To what degree did they envision Nazi Germany as a bulwark against the Soviet Union? What role would the U.­S. play in a world increasingly composed of competing economic blocs and military alliances? Storm on the Horizon is certain to become the . . .

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In Danger Undaunted, based on 338 manuscript boxes deposited in 1942 in the archives of the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and peace, conveys the logic, complexity, and passion of the anti-­interventionist movement. The book illustrates the dramatic impact this well-­organized and vocal group had on the foreign policy of the United States and on the political behavior of many of America's most prominent statesmen of the prewar years.

Book rate:
0 downloads

When war broke out in Europe in 1914, political leaders in the United States were swayed by popular opinion to remain neutral; yet less than three years later, the nation declared war on Germany. In Nothing Less Than War: A New History of America's Entry into World War I, Justus D. Doenecke examines the clash of opinions over the war during this transformative period and offers a fresh perspective on America's decision to enter World War I.­Doenecke reappraises the public and private diplomacy of President Woodrow Wilson and his closest advisors and explores in great depth the response of Congress to the war. He also investigates the debates that raged in the popular media and among citizen groups that sprang up across the country as the U.­S. economy was threatened by European blockades and as Americans died on ships sunk by German U-­boats.­The decision to engage in battle ultimately belonged to Wilson, but as Doenecke demonstrates, Wilson's choice was not made in isolation. . . .

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Books of Justus D. Doenecke