Page 1 from 2

12 books of Edmund de Waal

THE NUMBER ONE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER

WINNER OF THE 2010 COSTA BIOGRAPHY AWARD

264 wood and ivory carvings, none of them bigger than a matchbox: Edmund de Waal was entranced when he first encountered the collection in his great uncle Iggie's Tokyo apartment. When he later inherited the 'netsuke', they unlocked a story far larger and more dramatic than he could ever have imagined.

From a burgeoning empire in Odessa to fin de siecle Paris, from occupied Vienna to Tokyo, Edmund de Waal traces the netsuke's journey through generations of his remarkable family against the backdrop of a tumultuous century.

'You have in your hands a masterpiece' Frances Wilson, Sunday Times

'The most brilliant book I've read for years... A rich tale of the pleasure and pains of what it is to be human' Bettany Hughes, Daily Telegraph, Books of the Year

'A complex and beautiful book' Diana Athill

Book rate:
12 downloads

The Ephrussis were a grand banking family, as rich and respected as the Rothschilds, who “burned like a comet” in nineteenth-­century Paris and Vienna society. Yet by the end of World War II, almost the only thing remaining of their vast empire was a collection of 264 wood and ivory carvings, none of them larger than a matchbox. The renowned ceramicist Edmund de Waal became the fifth generation to inherit this small and exquisite collection of netsuke. Entranced by their beauty and mystery, he determined to trace the story of his family through the story of the collection. The netsuke—drunken monks, almost-­ripe plums, snarling tigers—were gathered by Charles Ephrussi at the height of the Parisian rage for all things Japanese. Charles had shunned the place set aside for him in the family business to make a study of art, and of beautiful living. An early supporter of the Impressionists, he appears, oddly formal in a top hat, in Renoir’s. Marcel Proust studied Charles closely enough . . .

Book rate:
10 downloads

The Ephrussis were a grand banking family, as rich and respected as the Rothschilds, who “burned like a comet” in nineteenth-­century Paris and Vienna society. Yet by the end of World War II, almost the only thing remaining of their vast empire was a collection of 264 wood and ivory carvings, none of them larger than a matchbox.
The renowned ceramicist Edmund de Waal became the fifth generation to inherit this small and exquisite collection of netsuke. Entranced by their beauty and mystery, he determined to trace the story of his family through the story of the collection.
The netsuke—drunken monks, almost-­ripe plums, snarling tigers—were gathered by Charles Ephrussi at the height of the Parisian rage for all things Japanese. Charles had shunned the place set aside for him in the family business to make a study of art, and of beautiful living. An early supporter of the Impressionists, he appears, oddly formal in a top hat, in Renoir’s Luncheon of the Boating Party . Marcel Proust . . .

Book rate:
8 downloads

Two hundred and sixty-­four Japanese wood and ivory carvings, none of them larger than a matchbox: Edmund de Waal was entranced when he first encountered the collection in his great-­uncle Iggie’s Tokyo apartment. When he later inherited the netsuke, they unlocked a far more dramatic story than he could ever have imagined. From a burgeoning empire in Odessa to fin de siècle Paris, from occupied Vienna to postwar Tokyo, de Waal traces the netsuke’s journey through generations of his remarkable family against the backdrop of a tumultuous century. With sumptuous photographs of the netsuke collection and full-­color images from de Waal’s family archive, the illustrated edition of transforms a deeply intimate saga into a work of visual art.

Book rate:
7 downloads

The Ephrussis were a grand banking family, as rich and respected as the Rothschilds, who “burned like a comet” in nineteenth-­century Paris and Vienna society. Yet by the end of World War II, almost the only thing remaining of their vast empire was a collection of 264 wood and ivory carvings, none of them larger than a matchbox.­The renowned ceramicist Edmund de Waal became the fifth generation to inherit this small and exquisite collection of netsuke. Entranced by their beauty and mystery, he determined to trace the story of his family through the story of the collection.­The netsuke—drunken monks, almost-­ripe plums, snarling tigers—were gathered by Charles Ephrussi at the height of the Parisian rage for all things Japanese. Charles had shunned the place set aside for him in the family business to make a study of art, and of beautiful living. An early supporter of the Impressionists, he appears, oddly formal in a top hat, in Renoir’s Luncheon of the Boating Party. Marcel Proust . . .

Book rate:
8 downloads

An intimate narrative history of porcelain, structured around five journeys through landscapes where porcelain was dreamed about, fired, refined, collected, and coveted.­Extraordinary new nonfiction, a gripping blend of history and memoir, by the author of the award-­winning and bestselling international sensation, The Hare with the Amber Eyes.
In The White Road, bestselling author and artist Edmund de Waal gives us an intimate narrative history of his lifelong obsession with porcelain, or "white gold.­" A potter who has been working with porcelain for more than forty years, de Waal describes how he set out on five journeys to places where porcelain was dreamed about, refined, collected and coveted-­and that would help him understand the clay's mysterious allure. From his studio in London, he starts by travelling to three "white hills"-­sites in China, Germany and England that are key to porcelain's creation. But his search eventually takes him around...

Book rate:
7 downloads

Nenhuma das 264 miniaturas japonesas entalhadas em madeira e marfim era maior que uma caixa de fósforos. Edmund de Waal ficou fascinado ao encontrar essa coleção em Tóquio, no apartamento de seu tio-­avô, Ignace. Mais tarde, quando Edmund herdou os netsuquês, eles revelaram uma história muito mais ampla que ele imaginara...­De um florescente império em Odessa até a Paris do fin-­de-­siècle, da Viena ocupada à Tóquio contemporânea, Edmund de Waal refaz, ao longo do conturbado século XX, a jornada de uma coleção de miniaturas japonesas através de gerações de sua notável família.

Book rate:
1 downloads

Charles Ephrussi, qui inspira à Proust le personnage de Swann, fut le patriarche d'une des plus grandes familles de la bourgeoisie juive du XIXe siècle. Ami de Schnitzler et d'Hofmannsthal, ce banquier originaire d'Odessa qui vécut entre Paris et Vienne fut aussi un grand amateur d'art, à la tête d'une collection de miniatures japonaises sculptées, aujourd'hui miraculeusement conservées. Le dernier héritier de la famille, Edmund de Waal, s'est plongé dans ses souvenirs et son passé pour dépeindre sous les couleurs les plus vives un univers de raffinement et d'élégance et retracer le destin tragique d'une famille dans la tourmente du XXe siècle. En racontant comment la collection a échappé à la Gestapo, il relate une aventure à peine croyable, dans ses moindres détails, et brosse une galerie de personnages extraordinaires : d'Edmund de Waal, érudit et mécène, à Anna, vieille et loyale servante, qui préserva la collection du pillage nazi.­Des cercles de la haute société de Paris et . . .

Book rate:
1 downloads

The Ephrussis were a grand banking family, as rich and respected as the Rothschilds, who “burned like a comet” in nineteenth-­century Paris and Vienna society. Yet by the end of World War II, almost the only thing remaining of their vast empire was a collection of 264 wood and ivory carvings, none of them larger than a matchbox.
The renowned ceramicist Edmund de Waal became the fifth generation to inherit this small and exquisite collection of netsuke. Entranced by their beauty and mystery, he determined to trace the story of his family through the story of the collection.
The netsuke—drunken monks, almost-­ripe plums, snarling tigers—were gathered by Charles Ephrussi at the height of the Parisian rage for all things Japanese. Charles had shunned the place set aside for him in the family business to make a study of art, and of beautiful living. An early supporter of the Impressionists, he appears, oddly formal in a top hat, in Renoir’s Luncheon of the Boating Party . Marcel Proust . . .

Book rate:
0 downloads

Comments

No comments yet

Books of Edmund de Waal