May be you will be interested in other books by Amanda Smith:

An Autobiography, the Story of the Lord's Dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith, the Colored Evangelist: Containing an Account of Her Life Work of Faith, and ... in America, England, Ireland, Scotla
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Amanda Smith

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Title: An Autobiography, the Story of the Lord's Dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith, the Colored Evangelist: Containing an Account of Her Life Work of Faith, and ... in America, England, Ireland, Scotla

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Amanda Berry Smith (January 23, 1837 – February 24, 1915) was a former slave who became an inspiration to thousands of women both black and white.­In 1876, she was invited to speak and sing in England travelling on a first class cabin provided by her friends. The captain invited her to conduct a religious service on board and she was so modest that the other passengers spread word of her and resulted in her staying in England and Scotland for a year and a half. She next traveled to and ministered in India, then spent eight years in Africa working with churches and evangelizing. While in Africa she suffered from repeated attacks of "African Fever" but persisted in her work. As a strong proponent of the Temperance Movement both in Africa and in the United States, she was invited by noted temperance advocate Rev. Dr. Theodore Ledyard Cuyler to preach at his Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian Church in Brooklyn New York, then the largest church in its denomination. Upon her return from Africa, Amanda funded her own memorable opportunity. She funded The Amanda Smith Orphanage and Industrial Home for Abandoned and Destitute Colored Children. It was an institution for the poor and friendless colored children in a suburban neighborhood in Chicago. . The institution provided a home for children to become self-­reliant. Amanda traveled many states to help gather money to support her work. “Support for this institution depended on interracial cooperation for fund-­raising and an advisory board. To raise funds for the initial costs, Smith enlisted Methodist interracial cooperation across the country.­” She was dedicated and put forth a lot of energy for the home. However, she soon met conflict with the orphanage due to many problems such as financial, a fire that destroyed the building, conflict between Smith and the staff, complaints from neighbors, and failed inspections by the orphan home investigators. Two years following Smith’s death, another fire broke out in the home killing two girls. The building was closed for good.­[5] She continued to visit various nations and gained a reputation as "God's image carved in ebony.­"

Her autobiography was published in 1893.

(This pre-­1923 publication has been converted from its original format and may contain an occasional defect from the conversion process or from the original publication.­)

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