177 books for genre «Polar Regions»

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The astonishing saga of polar explorer Ernest Shackleton's survival for over a year on the ice-­bound Antarctic seas, as Time magazine put it, "defined heroism.­" Alfred Lansing's scrupulously researched and brilliantly narrated book -- with over 200,­000 copies sold -- has long been acknowledged as the definitive account of the Endurance's fateful trip. To write their authoritative story, Lansing consulted with ten of the surviving members and gained access to diaries and personal accounts by eight others. The resulting book has all the immediacy of a first-­hand account, expanded with maps and illustrations especially for this edition.

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41 downloads


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In The Longest Road , one of America’s most respected writers takes an epic journey across America, Airstream in tow, and asks everyday Americans what unites and divides a country as endlessly diverse as it is large.
Standing on a wind-­scoured island off the Alaskan coast, Philip Caputo marveled that its Inupiat Eskimo schoolchildren pledge allegiance to the same flag as the children of Cuban immigrants in Key West, six thousand miles away. And a question began to take shape: How does the United States, peopled by every race on earth, remain united? Caputo resolved that one day he’d drive from the nation’s southernmost point to the northernmost point reachable by road, talking to everyday Americans about their lives and asking how they would answer his question.
So it was that in 2011, in an America more divided than in living memory, Caputo, his wife, and their two English setters made their way in a truck and classic trailer (hereafter known as “Fred” and “Ethel”) from Key . . .

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7 downloads


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The TARDIS brings the Doctor and his friends to a space tracking base in the Antarctic - and straight into trouble. A space mission is going badly wrong, and a new planet has appeared in the sky.
Mondas, ancient fabled twin planet of Earth has returned. Soon its inhabitants arrive. But while they used to be just like the humans of Earth, now they are very different. Devoid of emotions, their bodies replaced with plastic and steel, the Cybermen are here.
Humanity needs all the help it can get, but the one man who seems to know what's going on is terminally ill. As the Cybermen take over, the Doctor is dying...
This novel is based on the final story to feature the First Doctor, which was originally broadcast from 8 to 29 October 1966. This was the first Doctor Who story to feature the Cybermen.
Featuring the First Doctor in his very last adventure as played by William Hartnell, and his companions Ben and Polly

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11 downloads


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New from Smithsonian Books, After the Ice is an eye-­opening look at the winners and losers in the high-­stakes story of Arctic transformation, from nations to native peoples to animals and the very landscape itself. Author Alun Anderson explores the effects of global warming amid new geopolitical rivalries, combining science, business, politics, and adventure to provide a fascinating narrative portrait of this rapidly changing land of unparalleled global significance.

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10 downloads
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The very best writing on the Antarctic, from James Cook's eighteenth-­century assertion that 'no man will ever venture further than I have done' to Lynne Cox's description of her epic, icy swim in the twenty-­first century - 32 first-­hand accounts of men and women challenging one of the Earth's last true wildernesses.
Here you will find both legendary tales of heroism and startling contemporary accounts of the impact of global warming on the Earth's sole undeveloped continent, including:
'Dog Days' by Robert Falcon Scott. 'The Loss of the Endurance' by Ernest Shackleton.­'Alone' by Richard E Byrd.­'The Killer under the Water' by Gareth Wood.­'Melting Point' by David Helvarg.­'Swimming to Antarctica' by Lynne Cox.

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8 downloads


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"If Outside magazine had been around during the first turn of the century, Fridtjof Nansen would have been its No. 1 cover boy.­"—The Chicago Sun-­Times In September of 1893, Norwegian zoologist Fridtjof Nansen and crew manned the schooner Fram, intending to drift, frozen in the Arctic pack-­ice, to the North Pole. When it became clear that they would miss the pole, Nansen and companion Hjalmar Johansen struck off by themselves. Racing the shrinking pack-­ice, they attempted, by dog-­sled, to go "farthest north.­" They survived a winter in a moss hut eating walruses and polar bears, and the public assumed they were dead. In the spring of 1896, after three years of trekking, and having made it to within four degrees of the pole, they returned to safety. Nansen's narrative stands with the best writing on polar exploration. 20 b/w photographs.

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8 downloads


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From avalanches to glaciers, from seals to snowflakes, and from Shackleton's expedition to "The Year Without Summer,­" Bill Streever journeys through history, myth, geography, and ecology in a year-­long search for cold--­real, icy, 40-­below cold. In July he finds it while taking a dip in a 35-­degree Arctic swimming hole; in September while excavating our planet's ancient and not so ancient ice ages; and in October while exploring hibernation habits in animals, from humans to wood frogs to bears.
A scientist whose passion for cold runs red hot, Streever is a wondrous guide: he conjures woolly mammoth carcasses and the ice-­age Clovis tribe from melting glaciers, and he evokes blizzards so wild readers may freeze--­limb by vicarious limb.

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5 downloads


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A mix of history, geography, myth, and personal truth, this book explores the Antarctic Peninsula, the South Shetland Islands, and the Weddell Sea—the most visited places in Antarctica. Filled with beautiful photographs by the author from his travels, this record offers a selection of anecdotal accounts of the merchantmen, navy men, sealers, whalers, and aviators who, along with scientists and adventurers, drew the first ghostly maps of the white continent. It delves into the heads and hearts of those who were driven to discover the unknown land and is ideal for the armchair traveler who wants to explore the continent’s past and present.

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9 downloads


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In the summer of 1984, Anthony Dalton embarked on a near-­fatal voyage in a small open boat along the wild northwest coast of Alaska, attempting a solo transit of the Northwest Passage. His sea quest ran parallel to an arduous relief expedition undertaken in 1897-­98, when the officers of the US cutter Bear set out to reach eight whaling ships that were stranded in thick ice, their crews on the verge of starvation. Both journeys are depicted in this captivating adventure tale, and Dalton's gripping description of his encounter with an icy hell explores the irresistible lure of risk and challenge that continues to draw adventurers to the Arctic, a place like no other.

Book rate:
7 downloads

Books for genre Polar Regions