11977 books for genre «Americas»

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In 1925, the legendary British explorer Percy Fawcett ventured into the Amazon jungle, in search of a fabled civilization. He never returned. Over the years countless perished trying to find evidence of his party and the place he called “The Lost City of Z.­” In this masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, journalist David Grann interweaves the spellbinding stories of Fawcett’s quest for “Z” and his own journey into the deadly jungle, as he unravels the greatest exploration mystery of the twentieth century.

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270 downloads


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is the first work to use the lives of a select number of representative women as a microcosm to illuminate the larger crisis of the Salem witch trials. By the end of the trials, beyond the twenty who were executed and the five who perished in prison, 207 individuals had been accused, 74 had been “afflicted,­” 32 had officially accused their fellow neighbors, and 255 ordinary people had been inexorably drawn into that ruinous and murderous vortex, and this doesn’t include the religious, judicial, and governmental leaders. All this adds up to what the Rev. Cotton Mather called “a desolation of names.­” The individuals involved are too often reduced to stock characters and stereotypes when accuracy is sacrificed to indignation. And although the flood of names and detail in the history of an extraordinary event like the Salem witch trials can swamp the individual lives involved, individuals still deserve to be remembered and, in remembering specific lives, modern readers can benefit . . .

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101 downloads


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In this powerful, epic biography, David McCullough unfolds the adventurous life-­journey of John Adams, the brilliant, fiercely independent, often irascible, always honest Yankee patriot -- "the colossus of independence,­" as Thomas Jefferson called him -- who spared nothing in his zeal for the American Revolution; who rose to become the second President of the United States and saved the country from blundering into an unnecessary war; who was learned beyond all but a few and regarded by some as "out of his senses"; and whose marriage to the wise and valiant Abigail Adams is one of the moving love stories in American history. Like his masterly, Pulitzer Prize-­winning biography David McCullough's has the sweep and vitality of a great novel. It is both a riveting portrait of an abundantly human man and a vivid evocation of his time, much of it drawn from an outstanding collection of Adams family letters and diaries. In particular, the more than one thousand surviving letters between . . .

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369 downloads


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When General George Washington beat a hasty retreat from New York City in August 1776, many thought the American Revolution might soon be over. Instead, Washington rallied—thanks in large part to a little-­known, top-­secret group called the Culper Spy Ring. Washington realized that he couldn’t beat the British with military might, so he recruited a sophisticated and deeply secretive intelligence network to infiltrate New York. So carefully guarded were the members’ identities that one spy’s name was not uncovered until the twentieth century, and one remains unknown today. But by now, historians have discovered enough information about the ring’s activities to piece together evidence that these six individuals turned the tide of the war. Drawing on extensive research, Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger have painted compelling portraits of George Washington’s secret six: Robert Townsend, the reserved Quaker merchant and reporter who headed the Culper Ring, keeping his identity secret . . .

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61 downloads


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Since its first publication in 1995, has gone on to win an American Book Award, the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-­Racist Scholarship, and to sell over half a million copies in its various editions. What started out as a survey of the twelve leading American history textbooks has ended up being what the calls “an extremely convincing plea for truth in education.­” In, James W. Loewen brings history alive in all its complexity and ambiguity. Beginning with pre-­Columbian history and ranging over characters and events as diverse as Reconstruction, Helen Keller, the first Thanksgiving, and the Mai Lai massacre, Loewen offers an eye-­opening critique of existing textbooks, and a wonderful retelling of American history as it should-­and could-­be taught to American students. This 10th anniversary edition features a handsome new cover and a new introduction by the author.

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141 downloads


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is acclaimed historian Paul Collins’ remarkable true account of a stunning turn-­of-­the-­19th century murder and the trial that ensued – a showdown in which iconic political rivals Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr joined forces to make sure justice was done. Still our nation’s longest running “cold case,­” the mystery of Elma Sands finally comes to a close with this book, which delivers the first substantial break in the case in over 200 years. In the closing days of 1799, the United States was still a young republic. Waging a fierce battle for its uncertain future were two political parties: the well-­moneyed Federalists, led by Alexander Hamilton, and the populist Republicans, led by Aaron Burr. The two finest lawyers in New York, Burr and Hamilton were bitter rivals both in and out of the courtroom, and as the next election approached—with Manhattan likely to be the swing district on which the presidency would hinge—their animosity reached a crescendo. Central to their dispute . . .

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82 downloads


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Los Angeles was the fastest growing city in the world, mad with oil fever, get-­rich-­quick schemes, and celebrity scandals. It was also rife with organized crime, with a mayor in the pocket of the syndicates and a DA taking bribes to throw trials. In, Richard Rayner narrates the entwined lives of two men, Dave Clark and Leslie White, who were caught up in the crimes, murders, and swindles of the day. Over a few transformative years, as the boom times shaded into the Depression, the adventures of Clark and White would inspire pulp fiction and replace L.­A.­’s reckless optimism with a new cynicism. Together, theirs is the tale of how the city of sunshine went noir.

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168 downloads


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It is the richest, most influential, most powerful university in the world, but at the beginning of 2001, Harvard was in crisis. Students complained that a Harvard education had grown mediocre. Professors charged that the university cared more about money than about learning. Harvard may have possessed a $19 billion endowment, but had it lost its soul? The members of Harvard's governing board knew that they had to act. And so they made a bold pick for Harvard's twenty-­seventh president: former Treasury Secretary and intellectual prodigy economist Lawrence Summers. Although famously brilliant, Summers was a high-­stakes gamble. In the 1990s he had crafted American policies to stabilize the global economy, quietly becoming one of the world's most powerful men. But while many admired Summers, his critics called him elitist, imperialist, and arrogant beyond measure. Today Larry Summers sits atop a university in a state of upheaval, unsure of what it stands for and where it is going. . . .

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37 downloads
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In 1927 Nan Britton self-­published a tell-­all book that supposedly described her affair with Warren Harding, and told about Nan Britton's efforts supposedly on behalf of Harding's love child. The 1927 book sold 110,­000 official copies, plus bootlegged copies. Here is what she claimed— In 1910, when Nan Britton was fourteen, she developed a crush on Marion, Ohio's most prominent citizen, forty-­five-­year-­old Warren Harding. In 1917, when Nan Britton was twenty-­one and Harding was fifty-­two and a U.­S. senator, she started an affair with him. In October of 1919, Nan Britton gave birth to a daughter, Elizabeth Ann, of whom Warren Harding was secretly the father. Harding was generous with cash for the raising of his child, either handing Nan the cash in person (yes, the affair continued into the White House); or money was delivered to Nan Britton by a Secret Service agent, "Tim Slade.­" The book mentions Harding making only one request to Nan Britton: That if "something should happen . . .

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30 downloads

Books for genre Americas