1709 books for genre «Planning»

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Turn on the faucet, and water pours out. Pull out the drain plug, and the dirty water disappears. Most of us give little thought to the hidden systems that bring us water and take it away when we’re done with it. But these underappreciated marvels of engineering face an array of challenges that cannot be solved without a fundamental change to our relationship with water, David Sedlak explains in this enlightening book. To make informed decisions about the future, we need to understand the three revolutions in urban water systems that have occurred over the past 2,­500 years and the technologies that will remake the system. The author starts by describing Water 1.­0, the early Roman aqueducts, fountains, and sewers that made dense urban living feasible. He then details the development of drinking water and sewage treatment systems—the second and third revolutions in urban water. He offers an insider’s look at current systems that rely on reservoirs, underground pipe networks, . . .

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This book examines issues of decision-­making, communication and power in the planning process. The author explores the politics and power-­plays which planning practitioners face and engage in, using real examples from planning practice. The book explores planning but in the context of practice, i.­e. how it is actually encountered in the worlds of planning officers and elected representatives. It will shed light on the subtleties of power so that student and practitioners will better understand the circumstances in which they will find themselves and will able to act more effectively in what is in reality a messy, highly-­politicized, planning decision-­making process.

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A major concern of all decision makers has been to ensure that there are clear benefits from transport investment proposals. The travel time savings are clear, but the wider economic developments have presented enormous difficulty in terms of both theoretical arguments and empirical evidence. This book reviews the history of the debate and argues that the agenda has changed. These issues are presented together with a major analytical investigation of macro economic models, evaluation in transport and micro economic approaches. The final part of the book presents a series of case studies for road, rail and airport investment schemes, particularly focusing on the economic development aspects.

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Can the state solve housing problems or does it create them? This book explores the question by combining a detailed critique of contemporary housing policy with a philisophical analysis of the role of the state and individuals. Examining the state's role as controller and funder of housing, the author contends that the state is not capable of planning and controlling a sustainable housing policy.

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Traditionally, architecture has been preoccupied with the resolution of form. That concern helps to make photogenic buildings, which have received a great deal of attention. This book looks instead at the idea of the flows, which connects things together and moves between things. It is more difficult to discuss, but more necessary, because it is what makes things work. Architects have to think about flow - the flow of people through buildings, the flow of energy into buildings, and waste out of them - but usually the effects of flow do not find expression. The essays gathered here present a collection of exploratory ideas and offer an understanding of buildings, people and settlements through concepts of flow.

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When disaster strikes in cities the effects can be catastrophic compared to other environments. But what factors actually determine the vulnerability or resilience of cities? The Vulnerability of Cities fills a vital gap in disaster studies by examining the too-­often overlooked impact of disasters on cities, the conditions leading to high losses from urban disasters and why some households and communities withstand disaster more effectively than others. Mark Pelling takes a fresh look at the literature on disasters and urbanization in light of recent catastrophes. He presents three detailed studies of cities in the global South, drawn from countries with contrasting political and developmental contexts: Bridgetown, Barbados - a liberal democracy; Georgetown, Guyana - a post socialist-­state; and Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic - an authoritarian state in democratic transition. This book demonstrates that strengthening local capacity - through appropriate housing, . . .

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This book is recommended reading for planners preparing to take the AICP exam. In this new book, Michael Brooks bridges the gap between theory and practice. He describes an original approach—Feedback Strategy—that builds on the strengths of previous planning theories with one big difference: it not only acknowledges but welcomes politics—the bogeyman of real-­world planning. Don't hold your nose or look the other way, Brooks advises planners, but use politics to your own advantage. Brooks admits that most of the time planning theory doesn't have much to do with planning practice. These ideas rooted in the planner's real world are different. This strategy employs everyday poltiical processes to advance planning, trusts planners' personal values and professional ethics, and depends on their ability to help clients articulate a vision. Planning Theory for Practitioners will encourage not only veteran planners searching for a fresh approach, but also students and recent graduates . . .

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Books for genre Planning