11528 books for genre «Military»

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A trajetória de um brasileiro, ex piloto militar, na Legião Estrangeira Francesa, guerra colonial portuguesa, Comandos Especiais em Angola, Resistência Moçambicana, Serviços Especiais na Rhodesia e no Grupo Ligeiro de Cavalaria da Legião Estrangeira Espanhola,­o Tercio Don Juan de Áustria.

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These two volumes constitute a record of the technical, administrative, and policy-­making activities of the Los Alamos Project (Project Y) from its inception under the Manhattan District through the development of the atomic bomb (Vol. I), and during the period following the end of World War II until the Manhattan District relinquished control to the Atomic Energy Commission as of January 1947.

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In July 1942, Farley Mowat was an eager young infantryman bound for Europe and impatient for combat. This powerful, true account of the action he saw, fighting desperately to push the Nazis out of Italy, evokes the terrible reality of war with an honesty and clarity fiction can only imitate. In scene after unforgettable scene, he describes the agony and antic humor of the soldier's existence: the tedium of camp life, the savagery of the front, and the camaraderie shared by those who have been bloodied in battle.­ReviewThere is a deceptive quiet to the beginning of this recollection by Farley Mowat of the hell he and his comrades endured in the bloody Sicilian and Italian campaigns of World War II. And the undersized, baby-­faced young man the author was three decades ago, eager to "get a damn good lick in at the Hun,­" seems, in the first few pages, unendurably callow, striking attitudes as false and dated as his slang. But he grows up fast and the battles he survived as a second . . .

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Most of us rally around the glory of the Allies' victory over the Nazis in World War II. The story is often told of how the good fight was won by an astonishing array of manpower and stunning tactics. However, what is often overlooked is how the intersection between Adolf Hitler's influential personality and his military strategy was critical in causing Germany to lose the war. With an acute eye for detail and his use of clear prose, acclaimed military historian Bevin Alexander goes beyond counterfactual "What if?­" history and explores for the first time just how close the Allies were to losing the war. Using beautifully detailed, newly designed maps, How Hitler Could Have Won World War II    exquisitely illustrates the  important battles and how certain key movements and mistakes by Germany were crucial in determining the war's outcome. Alexander's harrowing study shows how only minor tactical changes in Hitler's military approach could have changed the world we live in today. . . .

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“The riveting true story of a World War II bomber pilot and the co-­pilot who received orders to kill him…After the twists and turns in Goering's many missions, Frater finishes with a stunning revelation…the author delivers an exciting read full of little-­known facts about the war. A WWII thrill ride.­” ―Kirkus Reviews An unforgettable and thrilling tale of two WWII American bomber pilots who forged an unexpected friendship in the flak-­filled skies over Nazi Germany. The air battle over Nazi Germany in WWII was hell above earth. It lasted three years and cost 125,­000 Allied aircrew men, including 26,­000 Americans from the US Army's Eighth Air Force in England, their lives. For bomber crews, every day they flew was like D-­Day, exacting tremendous amounts of emotional uncertainty and trauma. Some men, like twenty-­year-­old U.­S. Captain Werner Goering, accepted this, even thrived on and welcomed the adrenaline rush. They knew that death could come in a variety of ways: an unlucky flak . . .

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New York Times Bestseller
"A poignant, fascinating story, bringing to life the soldier-­scholars who saved Italy's treasures.­"—Evan Thomas, best-­selling author of Ike’s Bluff and Sea of Thunder
When Hitler’s armies occupied Italy in 1943, they also seized control of mankind’s greatest cultural treasures. As they had done throughout Europe, the Nazis could now plunder the masterpieces of the Renaissance, the treasures of the Vatican, and the antiquities of the Roman Empire.
On the eve of the Allied invasion, General Dwight Eisenhower empowered a new kind of soldier to protect these historic riches. In May 1944 two unlikely American heroes—artist Deane Keller and scholar Fred Hartt—embarked from Naples on the treasure hunt of a lifetime, tracking billions of dollars of missing art, including works by Michelangelo, Donatello, Titian, Caravaggio, and Botticelli.
With the German army retreating up the Italian peninsula, orders came from the highest levels of the Nazi government to . . .

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The death of General George S. Patton is shrouded in mystery. While officially the result of an unfortunate car accident, the evidence points to a far more malevolent plot: murder. So says investigative and military journalist Robert K. Wilcox in his book:. Written like a WWII spy thriller and meticulously researched, leads you through that fateful December day in 1945, revealing a chilling plan to assassinate General Patton. Backing up this shocking story with facts, photos, and eyewitness statements, Wilcox reveals long-­hidden documents and accounts that explain how secrets Patton knew-­and his strong anti-­Soviet views-­may have cost him his life. Not only does Wilcox reveal how, why, and when, he also names names-­exposing little-­known stories and secrets of such key players as General "Wild Bill" Donovan, the storied head of the OSS (the predecessor to the CIA); an OSS assassin; an Army intelligence agent; and even Josef Stalin himself. challenges readers to look at the evidence . . .

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The explosive story of America's secret post-­WWII science programs, from the author of the New York Times bestseller Area 51In the chaos following World War II, the U.­S. government faced many difficult decisions, including what to do with the Third Reich's scientific minds. These were the brains behind the Nazis' once-­indomitable war machine. So began Operation Paperclip, a decades-­long, covert project to bring Hitler's scientists and their families to the United States.­Many of these men were accused of war crimes, and others had stood trial at Nuremberg; one was convicted of mass murder and slavery. They were also directly responsible for major advances in rocketry, medical treatments, and the U.­S. space program. Was Operation Paperclip a moral outrage, or did it help America win the Cold War?­Drawing on exclusive interviews with dozens of Paperclip family members, colleagues, and interrogators, and with access to German archival documents (including previously unseen papers made . . .

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Already a classic of war reporting and now reissued as a Grove Press paperback, is Mark Bowden’s brilliant account of the longest sustained firefight involving American troops since the Vietnam War. On October 3, 1993, about a hundred elite U.­S. soldiers were dropped by helicopter into the teeming market in the heart of Mogadishu, Somalia. Their mission was to abduct two top lieutenants of a Somali warlord and return to base. It was supposed to take an hour. Instead, they found themselves pinned down through a long and terrible night fighting against thousands of heavily armed Somalis. The following morning, eighteen Americans were dead and more than seventy had been badly wounded. Drawing on interviews from both sides, army records, audiotapes, and videos (some of the material is still classified), Bowden’s minute-­by-­minute narrative is one of the most exciting accounts of modern combat ever written-­a riveting story that captures the heroism, courage, and brutality of battle.

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Books for genre Military