3315 books for genre «World War II»

Page 1 from 100


Author:

On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared. It was that of a young lieutenant, the plane’s bombardier, who was struggling to a life raft and pulling himself aboard. So began one of the most extraordinary odysseys of the Second World War. The lieutenant’s name was Louis Zamperini. In boyhood, he’d been a cunning and incorrigible delinquent, breaking into houses, brawling, and fleeing his home to ride the rails. As a teenager, he had channeled his defiance into running, discovering a prodigious talent that had carried him to the Berlin Olympics and within sight of the four-­minute mile. But when war had come, the athlete had become an airman, embarking on a journey that led to his doomed flight, a tiny raft, and a drift into the unknown. Ahead of Zamperini lay thousands of miles of open ocean, leaping sharks, a . . .

Book rate:
1698 downloads


Author:

The African-­American contribution to winning World War II has never been celebrated as profoundly as in. In this inspirational and uniquely personal tribute, the essential part played by black servicemen and -­women in that cataclysmic conflict is brought home. Here are letters, photographs, oral histories, and rare documents, collected by historian Christopher Moore, the son of two black WWII veterans. Weaving his family history with that of his people and nation, Moore has created an unforgettable tapestry of sacrifice, fortitude, and courage. From the 1,­800 black soldiers who landed at Normandy Beach on D-­Day, and the legendary Tuskegee Airmen who won ninety-­five Distinguished Flying Crosses, to the 761st Tank Battalion who, under General Patton, helped liberate Nazi death camps, the invaluable effort of black Americans to defend democracy is captured in word and image. Readers will be introduced to many unheralded heroes who helped America win the war, including Dorie Miller, . . .

Book rate:
14 downloads


Author:

Physicist and Oxford educated historian Joseph P. Farrell continues his best-­selling series of expose's on secret Nazi technology, Nazi survival, and post-­war Nazi manipulation of various manufacturing technologies, economies and whole countries. Beginning with pre-­War corporate partnerships in the USA, including the Bush family, he moves on to the surrender of Nazi Germany, and evacuation plans of the Germans. He then covers the vast, and still-­little-­known recreation of Nazi Germany in South America with help of Juan Peron, I.­G. Farben and Martin Bormann. Farrell then covers Nazi Germany's Penetration of the Muslim World including Wilhelm Voss and Otto Skorzeny in Gamel Abdul Nasser's Egypt before moving onto the development and control of New Energy Technologies including the Bariloche Fusion Project, Dr. Philo Farnsworth's Plasmator, and the Work of Dr. Nikolai Kozyrev. Finally, Farrell discusses the Nazi desire to control space, and examines their connection with NASA, the . . .

Book rate:
30 downloads


Author:

In the early morning hours of June 6, 1944, a small detachment of British airborne troops stormed the German defense forces and paved the way for the Allied invasion of Europe. Pegasus Bridge was the first engagement of D-­Day, the turning point of World War II. This gripping account of it by acclaimed author Stephen Ambrose brings to life a daring mission so crucial that, had it been unsuccessful, the entire Normandy invasion might have failed. Ambrose traces each step of the preparations over many months to the minute-­by-­minute excitement of the hand-­to-­hand confrontations on the bridge. This is a story of heroism and cowardice, kindness and brutality -- the stuff of all great adventures.

Book rate:
83 downloads


Author:

“The riveting true story of a World War II bomber pilot and the co-­pilot who received orders to kill him…After the twists and turns in Goering's many missions, Frater finishes with a stunning revelation…the author delivers an exciting read full of little-­known facts about the war. A WWII thrill ride.­” ―Kirkus Reviews An unforgettable and thrilling tale of two WWII American bomber pilots who forged an unexpected friendship in the flak-­filled skies over Nazi Germany. The air battle over Nazi Germany in WWII was hell above earth. It lasted three years and cost 125,­000 Allied aircrew men, including 26,­000 Americans from the US Army's Eighth Air Force in England, their lives. For bomber crews, every day they flew was like D-­Day, exacting tremendous amounts of emotional uncertainty and trauma. Some men, like twenty-­year-­old U.­S. Captain Werner Goering, accepted this, even thrived on and welcomed the adrenaline rush. They knew that death could come in a variety of ways: an unlucky flak . . .

Book rate:
17 downloads


Author:

Most of us rally around the glory of the Allies' victory over the Nazis in World War II. The story is often told of how the good fight was won by an astonishing array of manpower and stunning tactics. However, what is often overlooked is how the intersection between Adolf Hitler's influential personality and his military strategy was critical in causing Germany to lose the war. With an acute eye for detail and his use of clear prose, acclaimed military historian Bevin Alexander goes beyond counterfactual "What if?­" history and explores for the first time just how close the Allies were to losing the war. Using beautifully detailed, newly designed maps, How Hitler Could Have Won World War II    exquisitely illustrates the  important battles and how certain key movements and mistakes by Germany were crucial in determining the war's outcome. Alexander's harrowing study shows how only minor tactical changes in Hitler's military approach could have changed the world we live in today. . . .

Book rate:
144 downloads


Author:

New York Times Bestseller
"A poignant, fascinating story, bringing to life the soldier-­scholars who saved Italy's treasures.­"—Evan Thomas, best-­selling author of Ike’s Bluff and Sea of Thunder
When Hitler’s armies occupied Italy in 1943, they also seized control of mankind’s greatest cultural treasures. As they had done throughout Europe, the Nazis could now plunder the masterpieces of the Renaissance, the treasures of the Vatican, and the antiquities of the Roman Empire.
On the eve of the Allied invasion, General Dwight Eisenhower empowered a new kind of soldier to protect these historic riches. In May 1944 two unlikely American heroes—artist Deane Keller and scholar Fred Hartt—embarked from Naples on the treasure hunt of a lifetime, tracking billions of dollars of missing art, including works by Michelangelo, Donatello, Titian, Caravaggio, and Botticelli.
With the German army retreating up the Italian peninsula, orders came from the highest levels of the Nazi government to . . .

Book rate:
80 downloads


Author:

The death of General George S. Patton is shrouded in mystery. While officially the result of an unfortunate car accident, the evidence points to a far more malevolent plot: murder. So says investigative and military journalist Robert K. Wilcox in his book:. Written like a WWII spy thriller and meticulously researched, leads you through that fateful December day in 1945, revealing a chilling plan to assassinate General Patton. Backing up this shocking story with facts, photos, and eyewitness statements, Wilcox reveals long-­hidden documents and accounts that explain how secrets Patton knew-­and his strong anti-­Soviet views-­may have cost him his life. Not only does Wilcox reveal how, why, and when, he also names names-­exposing little-­known stories and secrets of such key players as General "Wild Bill" Donovan, the storied head of the OSS (the predecessor to the CIA); an OSS assassin; an Army intelligence agent; and even Josef Stalin himself. challenges readers to look at the evidence . . .

Book rate:
17 downloads


Author:

The explosive story of America's secret post-­WWII science programs, from the author of the New York Times bestseller Area 51In the chaos following World War II, the U.­S. government faced many difficult decisions, including what to do with the Third Reich's scientific minds. These were the brains behind the Nazis' once-­indomitable war machine. So began Operation Paperclip, a decades-­long, covert project to bring Hitler's scientists and their families to the United States.­Many of these men were accused of war crimes, and others had stood trial at Nuremberg; one was convicted of mass murder and slavery. They were also directly responsible for major advances in rocketry, medical treatments, and the U.­S. space program. Was Operation Paperclip a moral outrage, or did it help America win the Cold War?­Drawing on exclusive interviews with dozens of Paperclip family members, colleagues, and interrogators, and with access to German archival documents (including previously unseen papers made . . .

Book rate:
173 downloads

Books for genre World War II