1148 books for genre «Social Psychology»

Page 1 from 100


Author:

What is the difference between choking and panicking? Why are there dozens of varieties of mustard-­but only one variety of ketchup? What do football players teach us about how to hire teachers? What does hair dye tell us about the history of the 20 century? In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves:;; and Now, in, he brings together, for the first time, the best of his writing from over the same period. Here is the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling inventions of the pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz. Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the "dog whisperer" who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand. He explores intelligence tests and ethnic profiling and "hindsight bias" and why it was that everyone in Silicon Valley once tripped over . . .

Book rate:
2237 downloads


Author:

In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of "outliers"--­the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high-­achievers different? His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like, and too little attention to where they are from: that is, their culture, their family, their generation, and the idiosyncratic experiences of their upbringing. Along the way he explains the secrets of software billionaires, what it takes to be a great soccer player, why Asians are good at math, and what made the Beatles the greatest rock band. Brilliant and entertaining, OUTLIERS is a landmark work that will simultaneously delight and illuminate.

Book rate:
845 downloads


Author:

From Haruki Murakami, internationally acclaimed author of and, a work of literary journalism that is as fascinating as it is necessary, as provocative as it is profound. In March of 1995, agents of a Japanese religious cult attacked the Tokyo subway system with sarin, a gas twenty-­six times as deadly as cyanide. Attempting to discover why, Murakami conducted hundreds of interviews with the people involved, from the survivors to the perpetrators to the relatives of those who died, and is their story in their own voices. Concerned with the fundamental issues that led to the attack as well as these personal accounts, is a document of what happened in Tokyo as well as a warning of what could happen anywhere. This is an enthralling and unique work of nonfiction that is timely and vital and as wonderfully executed as Murakami’s brilliant novels.

Book rate:
856 downloads


Author:

Marketing visionary Martin Lindstrom has been on the front lines of the branding wars for over twenty years. Here, he turns the spotlight on his own industry, drawing on all he has witnessed behind closed doors, exposing for the first time the full extent of the psychological tricks and traps that companies devise to win our hard-­earned dollars. Picking up from where Vance Packard's bestselling classic,, left off more than half-­a-­century ago, Lindstrom reveals: • New findings that reveal how advertisers and marketers intentionally target children at an alarmingly young age – starting when they are still in the womb! • Shocking results of an fMRI study which uncovered what heterosexual men think about when they see sexually provocative advertising (hint: it isn’t their girlfriends). • How marketers and retailers stoke the flames of public panic and capitalize on paranoia over global contagions, extreme weather events, and food contamination scares. • The first ever neuroscientific . . .

Book rate:
312 downloads


Author:

Three thousand years ago on a battlefield in ancient, a shepherd boy felled a mighty warrior with nothing more than a stone and a sling, and ever since then the names of David and Goliath have stood for battles between underdogs and giants. David's victory was improbable and miraculous. He have won. Or should he have? In, Malcolm Gladwell challenges how we think about obstacles and disadvantages, offering a new interpretation of what it means to be discriminated against, or cope with a disability, or lose a parent, or attend a mediocre school, or suffer from any number of other apparent setbacks. Gladwell begins with the story of what happened between the giant and the shepherd boy those many years ago. From there, examines Northern Ireland's Troubles, the minds of cancer researchers and civil rights leaders, murder and the high costs of revenge, and the dynamics of successful and unsuccessful classrooms---­all to demonstrate how much of what is beautiful and important in the . . .

Book rate:
654 downloads


Author:

Consider Facebook—it’s human contact, only easier to engage with and easier to avoid. Developing technology promises closeness. Sometimes it delivers, but much of our modern life leaves us less connected with people and more connected to simulations of them.

Book rate:
189 downloads


Author:

In award-­winning business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. Distilling vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives that take us from the boardrooms of Procter & Gamble to sidelines of the NFL to the front lines of the civil rights movement, Duhigg presents a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential. At its core, contains an exhilarating argument: The key to exercising regularly, losing weight, being more productive, and achieving success is understanding how habits work. As Duhigg shows, by harnessing this new science, we can transform our businesses, our communities, and our lives. “Sharp, provocative, and useful.­” “Few [books] become essential manuals for business and living. is an exception. Charles Duhigg not only explains how habits are formed but how to kick bad ones and hang on to the good.­” “A flat-­out great read.­” “You’ll never look at . . .

Book rate:
190 downloads


Author:

What is the difference between choking and panicking? Why are there dozens of varieties of mustard-­but only one variety of ketchup? What do football players teach us about how to hire teachers? What does hair dye tell us about the history of the 20th century? In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves: The Tipping Point; Blink; and Outliers. Now, in What the Dog Saw, he brings together, for the first time, the best of his writing from The New Yorker over the same period. Here is the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling inventions of the pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz. Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the "dog whisperer" who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand. He explores intelligence tests and ethnic profiling and "hindsight bias" . . .

Book rate:
57 downloads


Author:

A pioneering neuroscientist shares his story of growing up in one of Miami's toughest neighborhoods and how it led him to his groundbreaking work in drug addiction. As a youth, Carl Hart didn't realize the value of school; he studied just enough to stay on the basketball team. At the same time, he was immersed in street life. Today he is a cutting-­edge neuroscientist—Columbia University's first tenured African American professor in the sciences—whose landmark, controversial research is redefining our understanding of addiction. In this provocative and eye-­opening memoir, he recalls his journey of self-­discovery and weaves his past and present. Hart goes beyond the hype of the antidrug movement as he examines the relationship among drugs, pleasure, choice, and motivation, both in the brain and in society. His findings shed new light on common ideas about race, poverty, and drugs, and explain why current policies are failing. Though Hart escaped neighborhoods that were dominated by . . .

Book rate:
52 downloads
  read online  


Author:

Robert Greene’s groundbreaking guides,,, and his latest book,, espouse profound, timeless lessons from the events of history to help readers vanquish an enemy, ensnare an unsuspecting victim, or become the greatest in your field. In, Greene has crafted an important addition to this ruthless and unique series. Spanning world civilizations, synthesizing dozens of political, philosophical, and religious texts and thousands of years of violent conflict, is a comprehensive guide to the subtle social game of everyday life informed by the most ingenious and effective military principles in war. Structured in Greene’s trademark style, is the I-­Ching of conflict, the contemporary companion to Sun Tzu’s. Abundantly illustrated with examples from history, including the folly and genius of everyone from Napoleon to Margaret Thatcher, Shaka the Zulu to Lord Nelson, Hannibal to Ulysses S. Grant, as well as movie moguls, Samurai swordsmen, and diplomats, each of the thirty-­three chapters . . .

Book rate:
217 downloads

Books for genre Social Psychology