124 books for genre «Humanism»

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Emily Brontë's only novel, this tale portrays Catherine and Heathcliff, their all-­encompassing love for one another, and how this unresolved passion eventually destroys them both, leading Heathcliff to shun and abuse society. First published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell, Wuthering Heights is considered to be a classic of English literature. Emily Brontë's novel opens the mind to the complexity of society and family heritage. Explores masculinity and femininity. Heathcliff's desire for revenge and his perseverance to obtain, what he never had and what he seeks in love and life. It demonstrates the ripple effect of life and how it can destroy generations in succession. The power of emotions and the naivety of man. The magnitude of education on society and societal roles. How life can destroy and produce life, the duality of its nature.

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The Count of Monte Cristo is a classic adventure story about a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail and sets out to gain his revenge. Set between the end of the Napoleonic wars in 1815 and 1838 during the reign of Louis-­Philippe, the historical setting of the novel is fundamental, as in Dumas' famous The Three Musketeers According to George Saintsbury "Monte Cristo is said to have been at its first appearance, and for some time subsequently, the most popular book in Europe. Perhaps no novel within a given number of years had so many readers and penetrated into so many different countries.­"

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is the most significant attempt in Western history to understand war, both in its internal dynamics and as an instrument of policy. Since the work's first appearance in 1832, it has been read throughout the world, and has stimulated generations of soldiers, statesmen, and intellectuals.

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Nietzsche proposes in "Beyond Good and Evil" a system of inquiry and analysis known by the phrase 'history as critique.­' This straightforward manner of investigation leads Nietzsche to question all of culture's most venerated conventions: science, religion, politics, decency and linguistic stock. He begins this process by overriding tradition when he says "only that which has no history can be defined.­" An explanation of virtue, for example, can only be written when the defintion eludes all possible requisites of custom and habit. We cannot properly administer the philosophical aspects of morality except through divine direction, suspicion, or an unexamined dependence on tradition. Because of this, Nietzsche calls to question the foundational premise that it is best for human beings to seek the truth. How do we know that mendacity isn't better? What is truth, anyway? He disputes the intention of the traditional esoteric venture. He unburdens all sources of cultural . . .

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What is the meaning of life? In the post-­modern, post-­religious scientific world, this question is becoming a preoccupation. But it also has a long history: many major figures in philosophy had something to say on the subject. This book begins with an historical overview of philosophers from Plato to Hegel and Marx who have believed in some sort of meaning of life, either in some supposed "other" world or in the future of this world. Young goes on to look at what happened when the traditional structures that provided life with meaning ceased to be believed.

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12 downloads


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This critical introduction understands posthumanism as a discourse, covering everything that has been and is being said about the figure of the 'posthuman'. It outlines the genealogy of the various posthuman 'scenarios' in circulation and engages with their theoretical and philosophical assumptions and social and political implications.

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A Treatise of Human Nature is a book by Scottish philosopher David Hume, first published in 1739?­1740.

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This book provides a richly rewarding vision of the burgeoning interdisciplinary field of somaesthetics. Composed of fourteen wide-­ranging but finely integrated essays by Richard Shusterman, the originator of the field, Thinking through the Body explains the philosophical foundations of somaesthetics and applies its insights to central issues in ethics, education, cultural politics, consciousness studies, sexuality and the arts. Integrating Western philosophy, cognitive science and somatic methodologies with classical Asian theories of body, mind and action, these essays probe the nature of somatic existence and the role of body consciousness in knowledge, memory and behavior. Deploying somaesthetic perspectives to analyze key aesthetic concepts (such as style and the sublime), he offers detailed studies of embodiment in drama, dance, architecture and photography. The volume also includes somaesthetic exercises for the classroom and explores the ars erotica as an art of living.

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Books for genre Humanism