383 books for genre «Literature of manners»

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Edith Wharton’s lacerating satire on marriage and materialism in turn-­of-­the-­century New York features her most selfish, ruthless, and irresistibly outrageous female character.

Undine Spragg is an exquisitely beautiful but ferociously acquisitive young woman from the Midwest who comes to New York to seek her fortune. She achieves her social ambitions—but only at the highest cost to her family, her admirers, and her several husbands. Wharton lavished on Undine an imaginative energy that suggests she was as fascinated as she was appalled by the alluring monster she had created. It is the complexity of her attitude that makes The Custom of the Country—with its rich social and emotional detail and its headlong narrative power—one of the most fully realized and resonant of her works.­Review"Edith Wharton's finest achievement.­"
--­Elizabeth Hardwick About the AuthorEdith Wharton (1862-­1937) was born into high society in New York City. After divorcing her husband in 1913 she took up . . .

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Like his novel E. M. Forster's focuses on a group of English men and women living and traveling in Italy. A young Englishman journeys to Tuscany to rescue his late brother's wife from what appears to be an unsuitable romance with an Italian of little fortune. In the events surrounding that match and its fateful consequences, Forster weaves an exciting and eventful tale that intriguingly contrasts English and Italian lives and sensibilities. As in Forster novels, among them and reveals the author's deep fascination with all of human experience—sexual, moral, spiritual, imaginative, material. Acutely observant of the ways of the English middle class, he is as critical here of its snobbishness, greed, and cultural insensitivity as he is respectful of its decency and kindness, common sense, and goodwill. This splendid novel reveals the great breadth of his gifts as both storyteller and humanist—attributes that continue to make him one of the twentieth century's most admired novelists.

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The Possessed (In Russian: ????, tr. Besy), also translated as The Devils or Demons, is an 1872 novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky. For an explanation of the marked difference in the English-­language title, please see the section "Note on the title" below.
An extremely political book, The Possessed is a testimonial of life in Imperial Russia in the late 19th century.
As the revolutionary democrats begin to rise in Russia, different ideologies begin to collide. Dostoevsky casts a critical eye on both the left-­wing idealists, exposing their ideas and ideological foundation as demonic, and the conservative establishment's ineptitude in dealing with those ideas and their social consequences.
This form of intellectual conservativism tied to the Slavophil movement of Dostoevsky's day, is seen to have continued on into its modern manifestation in individuals like Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Dostoevsky's novels focusing on the idea that utopias and positivists ideas, in being utilitarian, were . . .

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Written in the form of letters, it recounts a blossoming romance amid St. Petersburg's slums between a middle-­aged writer and a much younger seamstress.

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Henry James' comic short novel from 1878 follows the European siblings Eugenia Munster and Felix Young as they move to New England.

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This is the story of a daughter of divorced parents, Maisie - her feelings, triumphs and lows as she battles to come to terms with the end of her family, and the sillyness of her parents.

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My Lady Ludlow is a long novella (over 77,­000 words). It appeared in the magazine Household Words in 1858, and was republished in Round the Sofa in 1859, with framing passages added at the start and end.

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Rich with wisdom and gentle irony, Goldsmith's only novel tells of an unworldly and generous vicar who lives contentedly with his large family until disaster strikes. But bankruptcy, his daughter's abduction, and the vicar's imprisonment fail to dampen his spirit. Considered the author's finest work, this book is a delightful lampoon of 18th-­century literary conventions.­ReviewNovel by Oliver Goldsmith, published in two volumes in 1766. The story, a portrait of village life, is narrated by Dr. Primrose, the title character, whose family endures many trials--­including the loss of most of their money, the seduction of one daughter, the destruction of their home by fire, and the vicar's incarceration--­before all is put right in the end. The novel's idealization of rural life, sentimental moralizing, and melodramatic incidents are countered by a sharp but good-­natured irony. -- The Merriam-­Webster Encyclopedia of LiteratureAbout the AuthorOliver Goldsmith (1728 - 1774) was born in . . .

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Books for genre Literature of manners