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A treatise on electricity and magnetism. Volume 1. 504 Pages.

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This is a scan version of
"A treatise on electricity and magnetism Vol 1"
so worry not about spelling and punctuation errors that you usually found in kindle book, hope you like it :­), if you have any comment, feel free to post it right here(for preview and content, click at the cover).

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EDITOE'S PREFACE.

MOST of the following pages were written by the late Professor Clerk Maxwell, about seven years ago, and some of them were used by him as the text of a portion of his lectures on Electricity at the Cavendish Laboratory. Very little appears to have been added to the MS. during the last three or four years of Professor Maxwell's life, with the exception of a few fragmentary portions in the latter part of the work. This was partly due to the very great amount of time and thought which he expended upon editing the Cavendish papers, nearly all of which were copied by his own hand, while the experimental investigations which he undertook in order to corroborate Cavendish's results, and the enquiries he made for the purpose of clearing up every obscure allusion in Cavendish's MS., involved an amount of labour which left him very little leisure for other work.

When the MS. came into the hands of the present Editor, the first eight chaptei*s appeared to have been . . .

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[3,­250-­word article] Great Scots: James Clerk Maxwell and Catherine Sinclair. James Clerk Maxwell ranks between Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein in the triad of scientists who have done most to shape the world today. Although less well known than Newton or Einstein, Maxwell’s discoveries have had a profound influence on the way we live. The electromagnetic waves he discovered bring us radio and television and provide the radar which enables pilots to navigate the skies.

He analysed the phenomenon of color perception and verified the three component theory of color vision, which led him to invent the trichromatic process: the principal on which color television works. Using red, green and blue filters, he also produced the first color photograph — of a tartan ribbon.

Of greater significance, however, is Maxwell’s influence on physics. His central achievement was to unify light, electricity and magnetism by his ability to identify these as different representations of a single . . .

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Example in this ebook

Asked by my friends in France to introduce the author, Dr. Maxwell, to English readers, I willingly consented, for I have reason to know that he is an earnest and indefatigable student of the phenomena for the investigation of which the Society for Psychical Research was constituted; and not only an earnest student, but a sane and competent observer, with rather special qualifications for the task. A gentleman of independent means, trained and practising as a lawyer at Bordeaux, Deputy Attorney-­General, in fact, at the Court of Appeal, he supplemented his legal training by going through a full six years’ medical curriculum, and graduated M.­D. in order to pursue psycho-­physiological studies with more freedom, and to be able to form a sounder and more instructed judgment on the strange phenomena which came under his notice. Moreover, he was fortunate in enlisting the services of one who appears to be singularly gifted in the supernormal direction, an . . .

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I readily admit that many, who turn their attention to the curious phenomena of which I am going to speak, frequently lay themselves open to criticism. Sometimes they are not very strict concerning the conditions under which their experiments are conducted: they trust naïvely, and their conviction is quickly formed. I cannot too forcibly beg them to be on their guard against premature assertions: may they avoid justifying Montaigne’s saying, ‘L’imagination crée le cas.­’ My remark is more particularly addressed to occult, theosophical, and spiritistic groups. The first-­named follow an undesirable method. Their manner of reasoning is not likely to bring them many adepts, from among those who are given to thinking deeply. In ordinary logic, analogy and correspondence have not the same importance as deduction and induction. On the other hand it does not seem to me prudent to consider the esoteric interpretation of the Hebrew writings as being necessarily truth’s last word. I do not . . .

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MAGNETISM. CHAPTER I.

ELEMENTARY THEORY OF MAGNETISM.

371.­] CERTAIN bodies, as, for instance, the iron ore called load stone, the earth itself, and pieces of steel which have been sub jected to certain treatment, are found to possess the following properties, and are called Magnets. •

If, near any part of the earth's surface except the Magnetic Poles, a magnet be suspended so as to turn freely about a vertical axis, it will in general tend to set itself in a certain azimuth, and if disturbed from this position it will oscillate about if. An un-­magnetized body has no such tendency, but is in equilibrium in all azimuths alike.

372.­] It is found that the force which acts on the body tends to cause a certain line in the body, called the Axis of the Magnet, to become parallel to a certain line in space, called the Direction of the Magnetic Force.

Let us suppose the magnet suspended so as to be free to turn in all directions about a fixed point. To eliminate the action of its . . .

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SHORTLY after the death of Professor James Clerk Maxwell a Committee was formed, consisting of graduate members of the University of Cambridge and of other friends and admirers, for the purpose of securing a fitting memorial of him.

The Committee had in view two objects: to obtain a likeness of Professor Clerk Maxwell, which should be placed in some public building of the University ; and to collect and publish his scattered scientific writings, copies of which, so far as the funds at the disposal of the Committee would allow, should be presented to learned Societies and Libraries at home and abroad.

It was decided that the likeness should take the form of a marble bust. This was executed by Sir J. E. Boehm, R.­A., and, is now placed in the apparatus room of the Cavendish Laboratory.

In carrying out the second part of their programme the Committee obtained the cordial assistance of the Syndics of the University Press, who willingly consented to publish the present work. At the . . .

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PREFACE.

THE AIM of this book is to exhibit the scientific connexion of the various steps by which our knowledge of the phenomena of heat has been extended. The first of these steps is the invention of the thermometer, by which the registration and comparison of temperatures is rendered possible. The second step is the measurement of quantities of heat, or Calorimetry. The whole science of heat is founded on Thermometry and Calorimetry, and when these operations are understood we may proceed to the third step, which is the investigation of those relations between the thermal and the mechanical properties of substances which form the subject of Thermodynamics. The whole of this part of the subject depends on the consideration of the Intrinsic Energy of a system of bodies, as depending on the temperature and physical state, as well as the form, motion, and relative position of these bodies. Of this energy, however, only a part is available for the purpose of producing mechanical . . .

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This classic sets forth the fundamentals of thermodynamics clearly and simply enough to be understood by a beginning student, yet with enough subtlety and depth of thought to appeal also to more advanced readers. It elucidates fundamentals of kinetic theory and illustrates the Second Law of Thermodynamics with "Maxwell’s demon.­"

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Author: Maxwell, James Clerk, 1831-­1879 Subject bub_­upload, Heat Publisher: London : Longmans, Green, and co. Year published: 1872 Book contributor: National Library of Naples Language: en 4 downloads in the last month

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Maxwell made numerous contributions to science, but his greatest work was devoted to electricity. Here, he describes experiments proving that the electric charge can be measured. 1888 edition.

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Ueber physikalische kraftlinien. 154 Pages.

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CONTENTS:

INTRODUCTORY

I. ON THE BENDING OF SURFACES GENERATED BY THE MOTION OF A STRAIGHT LINE IN SPACE.
II. ON THE BENDING OF SURFACES OF REVOLUTION.
III. ON THE PROPERTIES OF A SURFACE CONSIDERED AS THE LIMIT OF THE INSCRIBED POLYHEDRON.

***

An excerpt from the Introductory:

[Read March 13, 1854.­]

Euclid has given two definitions of a surface, which may be taken as examples of the two methods of investigating their properties. That in the first book of the Elements is— "A superficies is that which has only length and breadth.­"

The superficies differs from a line in having breadth as well as length, and the conception of a third dimension is excluded without being explicitly introduced.

In the eleventh book, where the definition of a solid is first formally given, the definition of the superficies is made to depend on that of the solid—

"That which bounds a solid is a superficies.­"

Here the conception of three dimensions in space is employed in forming a . . .

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A treatise on electricity and magnetism. Volume 2. 502 Pages.

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